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On this Day in Movie History, February 27, 1934 Shirley Temple presented Oscar

On this day, February 27, 1934, a miniature version of Oscar was presented to child star, Shirley Temple in grateful recognition of her outstanding contribution to screen entertainment during the year 1934.

Two years later on this day 1936, Shirley Temple 20th Century Fox contracts to pay the seven-year-old star $50,000 per film an unprecedented sum at the time.

Born in 1928 in Santa Monica, California, Temple started appearing in a series of short films spoofing current movies, called Baby Burlesks, at the age of four. Based on the film’s success, 20th Century Fox signed little Shirley to a seven-year contract.

At the height of the Great Depression, Temple’s films provided a cheery alternate universe for audiences suffering the effects of widespread unemployment and general economic hardship.

By 1938, Temple was the No. 1 box-office draw in America. Over the course of the 1930s, the box-office success of her more than 40 films, including Poor Little Rich Girl, Wee Willie Winkie, Heidi and Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, went a long way towards helping Fox weather the Depression.

In 1950, she retired from movies, though she narrated the television series Shirley Temple’s Storybook from 1957 to 1959. Also in 1950, she married naval officer Charles Black, changing her name to Shirley Temple Black. With Black, she had two more children, Charles Jr. and Lori.

Temple Black published her autobiography, Child Star, in 1988. In 1999, at an event hosted by then-President Bill Clinton and his wife, Hillary, Temple Black received a medal from the Kennedy Center for lifetime achievement to the United States and the world.

Feb 11, 2014 Shirley Temple Black dies. She was 85.

1946 – The fourth of the “Road: films, “Road to Utopia”, starring Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Dorothy Lamour and Robert Benchley, opened in New York City. Bing and Bob wound up in Alaska posing as escaped killers in order to locate a lost gold mine. Tunes from the flick: “Put It There, Pal”, “Welcome to My Dreams”, “Would You?”, “Personality”, “Sunday, Monday, or Always”, “Goodtime Charlie” and “It’s Anybody’s Spring”.

1955 – “Billboard” announced that seven-inch, 45-rpm singles were outselling 78-rpm singles for the first time in the U.S.

Birthdays
1910 – Joan (Geraldine) Bennett (actress: House of Dark Shadows, Father of the Bride, Woman in the Window, The Son of Monte Cristo, The Man in the Iron Mask, Little Women [1933], Too Young to Go Steady; died December 7, 1990)

1927 – James (Leo) Herlihy (actor: Four Friends; writer: Midnight Cowboy, All Fall Down, Season of the Witch; died October 20, 1993)

1930 – Joanne Woodward (Academy Award-winning actress: The Three Faces of Eve [1957], Sybil, Philadelphia)

1932 – Elizabeth Taylor (Academy Award-winning actress: Butterfield 8 [1960], Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? [1966], Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award [1992]; Cat On a Hot Tin Roof, National Velvet, Cleopatra; Perfume spokesperson [Passion]) 1932 – Elizabeth Taylor (Academy Award-winning actress: Butterfield 8 [1960], Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? [1966], Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award [1992]; Cat On a Hot Tin Roof, National Velvet, Cleopatra; Perfume spokesperson [Passion])

1940 – Howard Hesseman (actor: WKRP in Cincinnati, Head of the Class)

1943 – Mary Frann (Mary Frances Luecke) (actress: Newhart, Fatal Charm, I’m Dangerous Tonight; died 23 September 1998)

1962 – Adam Baldwin (actor: Trade Off, Sawbones, Wyatt Earp, Radio Flyer, Predator 2, Full Metal Jacket, D.C. Cab, Ordinary People, My Bodyguard)

1962 – Grant Show (actor: Melrose Place, Beverly Hills 90210, True Blue, Ryan’s Hope, Texas, A Woman, Her Men and Her Futon, Treacherous Crossing)