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Oklahoma rape 2014: Pray that someone hears you (part 1)

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See this video noting what complicit replies enable https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4Up0drnXX4

Daniel Holtzclaw has been publicly accused of sexually assaulting multiple African American women while on the job as an patrolman for the Police Department of Oklahoma City.

Some news accounts of late note African American women made many attempts to approach the OKCPD with complaints of various aggressions and sexualized acts from a uniformed officer, including but not limited to rape prior to whatever accounts generated the arrest. Local released news identified to the public the arrests were made when sex attacks confirmed, but did not indicate what that was, or just exactly when. Six victims are noted so far. Many people want to know if reporting processes delayed quicker safety for the community, particularly for Black women, who appear to have been targeted.

In light of the recent questions of sexual assault rise in Oklahoma, it seems prudent to invite some reflection on what holds victimization in place in Oklahoma, over city streets, homes, courtrooms and government halls, and which is probably true nationwide, from the perspective of race.

African American's only make up 7.7% of the Oklahoma population. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/40000.html

Black females are somewhat invisible in Oklahoma, as they are nationwide, per The Black and Missing Foundation. http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ncic/ncic-missing-person-and-unidentified-person-statistics-for-2012 Black females are missing, murdered, sexually assaulted and often never make the news beyond the initial announcement, if that. Some are never reported at all, as missing, sexually assaulted or murdered. http://www.examiner.com/article/amazing-secrets-marginalization-of-missi...

As a fact, is the custom and law not to release any names of those victimized in sexual assault in Oklahoma. Even when names are available regarding crimes against Black females, they rarely make the news. http://www.examiner.com/article/oklahoma-is-listed-the-top-10-most-dangerous-places-mia-teens

In example, 13 year old Ke'alya Robinson, in OKDHS care was gone for months before the public was told, and the Black Chronicle broke that news in a highlighted information box, there has been no comment even a year later if she has returned. Because she was in OKDHS custody, her parents or other love ones technically had no right to post for her return, their status reduced, diminished as caring adults. In another instance, Tia Bloomer was an honor student, model and new Air Force recruit, mother of a two year old. In the news, mostly she was merely the black female stabbed to death at the bus station. Eventually, after years of suffering domestic abuses untended by OKDHS and Oklahoma County Court staffers she died at the hands of a partner whose seeming paranoia overtook her. Tia was merely 19 years old. http://www.examiner.com/article/policy-custom-or-law-oklahoma-courtrooms

A quick review of converging issues is here, from Dr. Michelle Alexander. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvUeOvLSEMI and it is wise to mark the words human rights violations and human rights for any of these discussions. Those are the wheels on which change and justice will ride for many things and many people. This is all of us, not just the black neighbors.

1491s is a Native American production company headed by Pawhuska (Osage County) native, Thomas Ryan Redcorn. Mr. Redcorn generated this very eloquent public service video for a Native American law service specializing in relational violence on the West Coast. The video, Poem to the Indigenous Woman was shot in Hominy, Oklahoma showing a spectrum of modern Native American community. Applicable to just about anyone, it is completely unforgettable in it's art and spoken word message reaching across cultures, ethnicity and race. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4Up0drnXX4

It is a fact Indigenous women are victimized per capita at a higher rate than almost any group. How many of the victims coming forward in Native America, are Black, and tribally affiliated? How many more victims will there be? Most sex offenders begin around 8th grade. Holtzclaw is in his middle 20's.

Perhaps Oklahoma finally properly fund and develop a nationally best practices based response to sexual assault for all ages in Oklahoma. Whether for residents, students, visitors or invited guests.

If you have concerns about the question of care of the women or any other inbound case reporting sexual assault in the Oklahoma City Police Department Rape issues please contact the Oklahoma County District Attorney, David Prater. http://www.oklahomacounty.org/departments/districtattorney/

The Oklahoma City Council meets every Tuesday morning at 8am in the Municipal building, downtown. If you have concerns about the performance and function of the Oklahoma City Police Department in relation to sexual assault response for this issue or other issues please contact any or all Oklahoma City Council and the Oklahoma City Mayor. http://www.okc.gov/council/

If you wish to donate, time, energy, money or services, please contact the Oklahoma City YWCA http://www.ywcaokc.org/site/c.7oJELRPuFgJYG/b.8087209/k.BEC7/Home.htm

If you know of a mishandled case of sexual assault for any age person outside of the Oklahoma City noted rapes above, please share your experiences with the elected representatives above.

If your case involves the assault on a minor or a person under the age of 21, by anyone, family member, hired caregiver, friend or stranger and you have concerns as to how it is being or was handled, please contact Janis Brown Paul, the federal monitor over Oklahoma for the Health and Human Services, Administration to Children and Families, Children's Bureau. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/ocse/im_12_02a.pdf

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