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Nun sentenced: 84-year-old nun gets 35 months, but maybe they should thank her?

Nun sentenced in protest break-in: 84-year-old Sister Megan Rice gets 35 months behind bars.
Nun sentenced in protest break-in: 84-year-old Sister Megan Rice gets 35 months behind bars.
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An 84-year-old nun was sentenced for her part in a nuclear break-in after she and two other activists managed to spend hours inside one of the “most tightly secured uranium processing and storage facilities in the country.” According to CNN News on Feb. 18, the nun was given a 35-month prison sentence for breaking in and posting banners, spray painting and spreading human blood over the premises in a peace protest.

While the courts are looking at this one way, the nun could have very well showed the people in charge of guarding this plant the error of their ways. All she did was put up some banners and spray paint messages of peace, but she did show the folks at the defense department that there is a blatant lack of security around this plant.

It is not clear what the other two activists with Sister Megan Rice received for sentences in their part of the crime, but from their prospective, it was nothing more than a protest that the three embarked on.

In the wee hours of the morning on July 28, 2012, this protest started with cutting a chain-link fence, which surrounds the Oak Ridge, Tennessee Y-12 National Security Complex. After walking a mile into the grounds, the trio cut three more chain-link fences.

They were in the facility for hours before a guard came along and caught the activists in the act. By this time they had gotten most of their intended displays of protest accomplished. Banners were hoisted into place on a building that houses enriched uranium. Human blood was splattered throughout and messages were spray painted all over the place, all in the name of peace.

The nun knew what she was risking when she embarked on this elaborate protest, so although she is not happy to go to jail, she understands the need for her to do this.

In the meanwhile, the people in charge of keeping the Y-12 nuclear site safe are looking into bulking up the security. If an 84-year-old nun can break the barriers that were put in place to keep folks out, it only stands to reason that others could too.

Unlike the nun, the others probably won’t be interested in just painting some messages. If you look at it this way, Sister Megan Rice and friends may have done the national security folks a favor. They showed them there is a need to clamp down on security there! Shouldn't the nun get some time off her sentence for preforming this duty for her country?

This nun isn't a harden criminal and she certainly doesn't pose a harm to anyone out in the community. Where are the presidential pardons when it comes to someone like Sister Megan Rice? If not for anything else, it would look good politically for the current administration.