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Not everyone agrees that bowlers are toughest and most dedicated around

Laura Hanson took issue that bowlers are the toughest around.
Laura Hanson took issue that bowlers are the toughest around.
Courtesy of Laura Hanson

Without a doubt, the toughest, most dedicated athletes around are bowlers.

That’s what this column so emphatically stated the other day – that bowlers are totally devoted to their sport – more so, than say tennis players and golfers.

This point was backed up by numerous examples of local bowlers who had sustained injuries or illness but had overcome them.

One such bowler cited was Jamie Beeler of Chatsworth, who survived a serious bout of kidney stones to complete his three games in league play.

Another bowler was Eric Haugsby of Woodland Hills, who got into a severe car accident during the day but still mounted the fortitude to stumble into his bowling center to take part in his league action later that night.

And a third bowler was Theo Sojourn of the Santa Clarita Valley, who sustained two broken bones in his right forearm but came back that week as a reincarnated left-hander who would soon blast a personal-best with his “off” hand.

But Laura Hanson was not really impressed with all these bowling feats. The Los Angeles award-winning amateur tennis player doesn’t dismiss the toughness of bowlers. She just wanted to give her group of fellow tennis players its due.

Said Laura: “Hey, not true about tennis players [that they’re not as tough as bowlers]. I have a friend who had surgery on his right arm and played left-handed for quite awhile!”

OK, so we’ll allow that some tennis players are pretty tough inside. But there weren’t any golfers stepping up to defend their ranks.

REPEAT PERFORMANCE: Just when I finished writing about Rick Auerbach’s stellar anchor performance as an example of why league bowling will always be a strong part of the game, Rick did it again.

Here’s his email from this week: “Talk about a comeback to win a game. Tuesday night, I was subbing for Kelly Gold. In the last frame of the third game, we were down 71 pins with just me and Dave Lewis, the anchor, to bowl. I said to Dave, tongue in cheek, ‘Come on, Dave, we can do this,’ making a joke.

“I am on a double going into the 10th and he is on a single. I punch out the 10th with three [strikes] in a row and tell Dave on the way to the lane, ‘OK, Dave, it’s your turn!’
Boom! Dave punches out and we win the game by nine pins. Talk about a comeback. Wow! I got a new ball and shot a 701! Must have been beginner’s luck!”

League play can definitely be exciting!