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North Korea goes after 'The Interview' in the United Nations

Recent reports about anger in North Korea about a movie starring James Franco and Seth Rogen dealing with a plot to assassinate Kim Jong Un have been no joking matter. Things have gone so so far with rising heated controversy over this movie that North Korea has filed a complaint with the United Nations over "The Interview" reported The Hollywood Reporter on July 11, 2014.

South Korean protesters burn a effigy of North Korea leader Kim Jong-Un and flag during a anti North Korea protest in Seoul, South Korea.
South Korean protesters burn a effigy of North Korea leader Kim Jong-Un and flag during a anti North Korea protest in Seoul, South Korea.
Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

In a letter which has been addressed to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon North Korea has called the movie a literal act of war. North Korea has now filed an official complaint with the United Nations over the Sony film "The Interview." This movie shares a fictional story of a plot aimed at assassinating the supreme leader of North Korea, Kim Jong Un. In the letter which was addressed directly to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon the U.N. Ambassador from North Korea, Ja Song Nam, has made the accusation that the United States is actually sponsoring terrorism and committing an act of literal war by allowing this movie to be made.

According to Reuters Ja wrote that it should be regarded as the sponsoring of terrorism and as an act of war to allow the production and distribution of such a movie dealing with the assassination of an incumbent head of a sovereign state. In this letter North Korea has urged the authorities in the United States to take immediate actions to ban the production and distribution of this movie. Otherwise the United States will be held responsible for encouraging and sponsoring terrorism according to North Korea.

"The Interview" is due to be released later in the year. The movie is about an American television show host and his producer who are granted an interview with Kim Jong Un. They are than recruited by the Central Intelligence Agency to assassinate the supreme leader of North Korean. In the letter to the United Nations from North Korea it is alleged this movie involves insulting and even assassinating Kim Jong Un.

The issues raised by North Korea are extremely sensitive and should not be taken lightly. Although creative freedoms are of paramount concern to Hollywood, peace and stability worldwide must also be concerns. This all must make us wonder if a movie centering around a theme to assassinate President Barack Obama was made would there not be anger in Washington, DC.

Let us consider if this movie dealing with a theme to kill Obama became a cult film which was viewed by the Taliban and Al Qaeda organizations by the campfire and by armed gang members in Chicago and elsewhere across the United States with infectious cheers arising when the plot to assassinate Obama emerged. And so paradoxically even among those of us who cherish creative freedoms the case by North Korea against "The Interview" should be carefully reviewed with an interest in doing everything possible to avoid a literal military conflict with a heavily armed North Korea.