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'New York Med' nurse fired from her real job over Instagram post

Is there really a place for television cameras in a hospital, anyway?
Is there really a place for television cameras in a hospital, anyway?Morguefile

Katie Duke is a nurse at New York Presbyterian Hospital, seen in the high-intensity medical reality series, "New York Med." She was fired from her real job after she re-posted an Instagram photo of the Emergency Room after treating a trauma patient, according to a Tuesday report on The New York Post. This photo, taken from the Instagram page of a doctor at the same hospital', and her hashtag, were deemed insensitive. Duke had written

#manvs6train.

The doctor who first posted the photo was not reprimanded. While Katie Duke has already found another job at another hospital, her work on "New York Med" is over unless they do a follow-up on her storyline. While the hospital has the authority to determine their own hiring and firing, it is a little hypocritical on their part. This nurse only posted a photo of an empty trauma room in the Emergency Room where she worked. The hospital is allowing television cameras into the hospital.

Although Duke was not cited for HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) privacy violations, she did mention enough information online to potentially reveal information about a patient who had been treated there for injuries from the 6 train. Fierce Healthcare discussed how tenuous things can be when medical professionals bring their work online. It is not uncommon, the site states, for medical professionals to disclose patient information. With all the piles of privacy paperwork patients are required to fill out because of HIPAA, it is a little ironic that we are having a discussion about how much or what part of our patient information is appropriate to share online or on television.

And, how can the presence of television cameras not distract the medical personnel? Whether it is just among the surgical team or the emergency room staff, the thought of the ever-present camera would be hard to ignore. Paying attention 99% of the time in a hospital setting is not good odds!

It just does not seem to be appropriate for anyone’s health information to be public information via any channel. It is usually hard for family or friends to get much-needed information about a patient’s condition. And, that is how it should be.