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New Superior Court building construction starts

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Half Union STreet fenced off downtown, Friday, C Street to B Street, the county's onstruction team ended its first week of work on clearing out the old buildings, concrete, and pavement on the lot a new 22 story Superior Court will stand. Broken cement blocks covered a torn up work zone next to a bulldozer on the back lot at B Street.

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The old low and long Superior Court built in the early 1960s kept its doors open on Broadway and handled the busy court work using the bridge connection over Union Street to the Hall of Justice that moves San Diegans in search of justice between the two court buildings. Monday, March 10th, County Supervisor Greg Cox led government official talks at the official opening for the work building the 71 courtroom building the county invested in to end concerns over safe and routine access to justice Presiding Jduge David J. Danielsen told the groundbreaking crowd tha main building construction will restore to a leading court function. The old Broadway building, Cox said, has reached the end of its useful life. Problems handling the asbestos levels, and, strengthening the building to handle seismic shock, defeated plans to keep using the familiar street level building.

A tough tall building designed to welcome San DIegans into walkways and rooms, filled with modern ADA access, mde to keep the court work moving, that will last the decades into the future, in 2016, will put an end to stressful and tiresome crowd habits experienced n a run down Superior Court building. Judges will set a new pace for the justice work done inside. Downtown court traffic, that traveled between three buildings in the past, will keep up the pace together, under one roof, in the 21st century.

At the Monday groundbreaking, the CAlifornia Supreme COurt's Chief Judge, Tani Cantil-Sukuye, helped get the work underway on the San Diego County investment. She called the new courthouse, a "tangible symbol of the State's commitment to access to justice."

The old bond company building on Union Street has a short time to stand in the place the new courthouse will go up. It is a misfit in the downtown court district. Even the words, "Proud To Be An American", painted on the building wall, above a large red, white and blue American flag, have had their day. WOrkers boarded up the Union Street building line. Connstruction dirt and construction pieces, on Friday, covered work grounds on the B Street corner. There is lots of work in store.

Supervisor Dave ROberts already weighed in on the job with Greg Cox at the grounbreaking. City leaders Kevin Faulconer and Todd Gloria, two more shovel handlers, had their opportunities to say final words before a new foundation gets put in at the Union Street and C STreet location. Construction workers settle in to do the job the politicians made part of the San Diego story on building for the future.

The hope is San Diegans will become more at ease getting counted present in the public's green environment inside a 22 story courthouse building naturally lit by the sun's light. And, follow the court schedule on good time. No routine delays.

THis is the latest story told for Saturday City Scene Chronicles. TO read earlier articles, read

Relaxing Tenth Ave filling up
Road conversions work flat in Kearny Mesa
Pomerado Health's time to build on Rancho Penasquitos hilltop

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