Skip to main content

See also:

New research shows Obamacare is not working in states that opted out

The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) will not reach the most vulnerable or the people who are uninsured according to the first analysis of the implementation of the ACA in all 50 states that was carried out by the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services that was published at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services website on Jan. 14, 2014.

This is a color-coded map showing the nine restrictive states and 21 states and the District of Columbia that fully implemented the federal health reform law. Health centers in the nine restrictive states report a hampered ability to enroll the uninsured.
This is a color-coded map showing the nine restrictive states and 21 states and the District of Columbia that fully implemented the federal health reform law. Health centers in the nine restrictive states report a hampered ability to enroll the uninsured.
The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services

The researchers show that the states that have restricted the full implementation of the ACA have employed 50 percent of the number of people involved in assisting the uninsured to obtain health insurance than states that implemented the ACA in its entirety.

People seeking health insurance were 20 percent less likely to receive information leading to assessing their eligibility for insurance coverage in states that opted out of the ACA.

The leaders of health centers in all the states that opted out of the ACA expect that at least 50 percent of their patients will remain uninsured.

The refusal to accept the expansion of Medicaid by the ACA has resulted in the Alabama Medicaid Agency requiring that all health care providers and pharmacies limit the number of outpatient pharmacy prescriptions to five total drugs (including up to four brands) per month for adults. The change in Medicaid policy in Alabama also requires the patients to pay for any prescriptions that were issued after Jan. 1, 2014, retroactively if the patient received more than five prescriptions. Children and nursing home patients are exempt from the change.

Alabama had to make this change in order to be able to pay for the loss of Medicaid dollars due to the decision to opt out of the ACA