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New research confirms youth's blood may reverse aging effects on older humans

Jutta Lueske, Joshua Preis and Sarah Connor at the program presentation of the World Blood Cancer Day on May 27, 2014 in Berlin, Germany.
Jutta Lueske, Joshua Preis and Sarah Connor at the program presentation of the World Blood Cancer Day on May 27, 2014 in Berlin, Germany.
Photo by Athanasios Gioumpasis/Getty Images

What could be the biggest medical breakthrough in our lifetime might be a true fountain of youth and reverse the effects of aging in humans, according to recent studies.

Scientists have known for a while that aging properties can be credited a great deal from the dwindling collapse of stem and telomere damage. Now they may have discovered a way to reverse this process to keep us youthful and healthier longer.

Last month several different studies by researches from Harvard and the University of California in San Francisco (UCSF) confirmed that blood infusions, when taken from young donors, will revitalize and reverse the effects of aging on the human body. Studies on mice prove the aging effects can be reversed on the brain, heart, muscles and other organs, leaving scientists to conclude this treatment could work on humans.

"The evidence is strong enough now, in multiple tissues, that it's warranted to try and apply this in humans," said Saul Villeda, a lead researcher involved in one of the studies. "There's something about young blood that can literally reverse the impairments you see in the older brain."

There were noticeable and startling reversals of age related damages to older mice when injecting young mice plasma into them. Blood was revived enough in older mice’s stem cells to cause new tissue growth, better cell health and senses progress.
UCSF linked the discoveries to a protein known as Creb, while Harvard also found CDF11, a protein that restored older mice protein to youthful conditions.

The researches will attempt clinical trials on humans within five years to determine if they can repeat the successes that the mice experienced.

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