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New report: 20 million more Americans have health care due to 'Obamacare'

President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Paramount Theatre on July 10, 2014 in Austin, Texas.
President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Paramount Theatre on July 10, 2014 in Austin, Texas.
Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images

Despite negative rhetoric constantly coming from the Republican party, the Affordable Care Act seems to be doing what it was set out to do.

The Affordable Care Act, or "Obamacare," was never a perfect solution to the health care problems in the United States. It doesn't provide true universal health care. It actually requires every American purchase a private product from an industry that has been demonized for years. Despite its flaws, "Obamacare" is a step in the right direction and new reports are showing that it is affecting millions of Americans in a positive way.

According to a new study from the Commonwealth Fund, published in last month's New England Journal of Medicine, the Affordable Care Act has opened the doors to insure more than 20 million Americans in one way or another. The report notes that just under 8 million young Americans under the age of 26 have taken advantage of the provision that allows them to stay under their parent's health care plan. The study also shows that 8 million people gained coverage through the health insurance marketplaces, while an additional five million purchased coverage through insurers.

The report notes that the ability of the United States to control health care costs will be key in keeping affordable health care available to the American people.

“Developing and spreading innovative approaches to health care delivery that provide greater quality at lower cost is the next great challenge facing the nation."

The number of insured could have been even higher but half of the states in the country still refuse to comply with the ACA and expand Medicaid. After the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act in 2010, they did deal a blow to the president's signature piece of legislation by removing the requirement of states to expand Medicaid. While healthcare in the United States has a long way to go, it's moving in the right direction.