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New Greenmarket Cookbook celebrates farmers markets with gourmet recipes

Sample recipes from this cookbook.
Sample recipes from this cookbook.
Da Capo Lifelong Books

For years, shopping at local farmers' markets has been one of the joys in my life. Talking with locals about their pride in their produce, sampling fresh-from-the-ground, dripping-with-juice oranges and crisp, crunchy almonds - all these experiences symbolize the healthy, happy experience. Now a new book celebrates all that and more with recipes and tips from great chefs combined with fascinating stories about the farmers who sell direct: "The New Greenmarket Cookbook: Recipes and Tips from Today’s Finest Chefs —and the Stories behind the Farms That Inspire Them" (click for details).

Recipe contributors include Jose Andres, Michael Anthony, Mark Bittman, April Bloomfield, Daniel Boulud, Melissa Clark, Dana Cowin, Amanda Hesser, Dan Kluger, Anita Lo, Michael Pollan, Eric Ripert, Audrey Saunders, Bill Telepan, and Christina Tosi. From spring to summer to fall to winter, the variety of recipes and interweaving stories make this a fascinating, fabulous and flavorful find.

We've included several recipe samples below. You can get more information on the "New Green Market Cookbook," including how to order, by clicking here.

LEMON THYME PANNA COTTA WITH RHUBARB COMPOTE AND LEMON THYME SHORTBREAD

You can make just one or two of this recipe’s three components—they’re wonderful alone or in any combination—but each part is so simple, it’s easy to make them all. Pastry Chef Pichet Ong’s yogurt panna cotta is sublime, requiring so little work, you’ll want to make it all year long as a creamy canvas for whatever berries you bring home.

Lemon thyme, whose leaves have little yellow edges and a fragrant citrus flavor, is transformative on lemon-loving mains like scallops or roast chicken, but it’s also bright and beautiful in sweets.

Variation inspiration: you can swap out the thyme for lavender, which is available May through July, for a flavor that’s both fresh and floral.

Ingredients

Panna Cotta

4 SPRIGS LEMON THYME

1 CUP MILK

1 1⁄2 CUPS CREAM

1 CUP SUGAR

1⁄4 TEASPOON SALT

1 3⁄4 TEASPOONS POWDERED GELATIN

1 CUP PLAIN WHOLE MILK YOGURT

Rhubarb-Strawberry Compote

3 TO 4 MEDIUM STALKS RHUBARB, TRIMMED AND CUT INTO 1⁄4-INCH DICE (2 CUPS)

3 TABLESPOONS SUGAR

1 VANILLA BEAN, SPLIT, SCRAPED, AND HALVED CROSSWISE

1 TABLESPOON LEMON JUICE, FROM ABOUT 1⁄2 OF A LEMON

1⁄2 CUP SLICED STRAWBERRIES

Lemon Thyme Shortbread

2 TABLESPOONS LEMON THYME LEAVES, PICKED FROM 1 SMALL BUNCH

ZEST OF 1 LEMON

11 TABLESPOONS UNSALTED BUTTER, AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

1⁄2 CUP SUGAR, PLUS MORE FOR SPRINKLING

1 TEASPOON VANILLA EXTRACT

1⁄4 TEASPOON SALT

1 CUP PLUS 2 TABLESPOONS ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR

by PICHET ONG, PASTRY CHEF, BLOG.PICHETONG.COM

Make the panna cotta: In a medium saucepan, combine the lemon thyme, milk, cream, sugar, and salt over medium heat and bring just to a simmer.

Remove from heat, cover, and let steep at room temperature for about 1 hour. Remove and discard the thyme.

In a small bowl, combine the gelatin with 2 tablespoons of cold water. Stir to combine and let sit for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, return the milk mixture to a low simmer (do not boil) then add the gelatin mixture and stir well. As soon as the gelatin dissolves, remove from the heat. Whisk in the yogurt and divide into 8 glasses or 4-ounce ramekins. Refrigerate until set, at least 5 hours.

Meanwhile, make the compote: Combine all ingredients except the strawberries in a small saucepan and let sit for 20 minutes to macerate. Cook over low heat until the rhubarb is soft, about 7 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool. Once cool, add the sliced strawberries.

Make the lemon thyme shortbread: Line a sheet pan with parchment paper and sprinkle lightly with sugar.

In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, blend together the lemon thyme leaves, lemon zest, butter, sugar, vanilla, and salt just until thoroughly combined. Add the flour and mix until the dough comes together. Form the dough into a rectangle, about 1-inch thick, and cover with plastic wrap.

Refrigerate until cold, about 1 hour.

On a lightly floured surface, roll the chilled dough into a large rectangle, about ½-inch thick.

Using a knife, cut rectangular cookies about 3½ inches long by 1 inch wide.

Transfer cookies onto a parchment-lined cookie sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 325°F.

Bake the chilled cookies until the edges turn golden brown, 15 to 18 minutes. Let cool on the cookie sheet for 2 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Garnish each panna cotta with 2 tablespoons of compote and serve alongside the shortbread.

SERVES 8

From The New Greenmarket Cookbook by Gabrielle Langholtz. Reprinted with permission from Da Capo Lifelong, © 2014

FRESH FETTUCCINE WITH SPRING GREENS

by DAVID WALTUCK, EXECUTIVE CHEF, ARK RESTAURANTS

Refined, market-driven menus made Chef Waltuck’s Chanterelle one of the most revered restaurants in New York for more than thirty years, but this dish is easy enough to toss together on a busy weeknight. Just blanch a mix of early spring leaves—anything from young, tender dandelion to ramp tops to simple spinach. Green garlic also works well if it’s young enough to resemble a scallion (though later in spring, as it grows taller and the bulb swells, it’ll be too tough for this pesto-like preparation).

2 POUNDS MIXED SPRING GREEN SUCH AS DANDELION, RAMPS, STINGING NETTLES, SPINACH, A LAMB’S QUARTERS

1 1⁄2 CUPS GRATED PARMESAN

3⁄4 CUP PLUS 1 TABLESPOON EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL, DIVIDED

SALT AND PEPPER

ZEST AND JUICE OF 2 LEMONS, ABOUT 2 TEASPOONS ZEST AND 4 TABLESPOONS JUICE

1 POUND FRESH FETTUCCINE

1 CUP HEAVY CREAM

Bring a large pot of water, seasoned generously with salt, to a boil. Meanwhile, trim and wash the greens. If using ramps, separate the bulbs and save for another use. If using spinach or dandelion greens, remove any tough stems. If using stinging nettles, handle them with gloves while raw.

Add the greens to the pot of boiling water and blanch for 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until just wilted. Reserve the cooking water but remove the greens with a slotted spoon, transfer to a colander, and cool under cold running water. Squeeze to drain any liquid. You should have about 2 cups of cooked greens.

Transfer the cooked greens to a food processor and puree with the Parmesan, ¾ cup olive oil, ½ teaspoon salt, and zest and juice of the lemons, to a fairly smooth paste that still has some texture.

Return the pot of water to a boil, add the fettuccine and cook until al dente, about 2 to 3 minutes for fresh pasta. Reserve ⅓ cup of the pasta water, then drain the pasta well and return to the pot. Add the cream and pureed greens and toss gently to combine, thinning with the reserved pasta water as needed. Cook over low heat about 1 minute until the sauce just coats the pasta. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve with more Parmesan on the side.

SERVES 4

From The New Greenmarket Cookbook by Gabrielle Langholtz. Reprinted with permission from Da Capo Lifelong, © 2014.