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New contractor taking over Obamacare website

A new outside contractor is taking over the problem-plagued HealthCare.gov, now that the Obama administration has decided not to renew its contract with lead website contractor CGI Federal.

New contractor taking over Obamacare website
New contractor taking over Obamacare website
Cartera Media

The White House and CGI announced Friday that, by mutual agreement, they are parting ways.

Although the health website is currently working for the most part, it’s disastrous debut on Oct. 1 and subsequent problems turned out to be a major embarrassment and political setback for the President’s signature health care law, commonly referred to as Obamacare.

Accenture, a technology company, is reportedly being tapped by the administration to take over HealthCare.gov after CGI’s contract runs out in February.

In a statement from Linda Odorisio, a spokeswoman for CGI, she noted that CGI had a major role in improving the health website after its calamitous launch.

"We are proud that more than 400 CGI employees worked around the clock from October through December to deliver a consumer experience that works for a vast majority of Americans," the statement read.

HealthCare.gov was supposed to be an online marketplace where Americans could shop for and purchase health insurance. Unfortunately, the site got off to a rocky start, with so many technological glitches that many people couldn’t even get on, let alone shop and buy insurance.

The White House tried to gloss over the initial problems as normal glitches, but it became obvious very quickly that there were some serious software flaws and other technological issues, which the Obama administration admitted caused the site to go offline 60 percent of the time during October.

Things started improving by the beginning of December, with more than a million people signing up for insurance on the federal website since then. When you factor in state-run websites, more than 2 million people have signed up.

CGI told Congress that the company wasn’t given enough time before the Oct. 1 deadline to adequately test the system before it debuted.