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Nearly half of Americans opposed to Obamacare's individual mandate

Pres. Obama gives an address on the Affordable Care Act from the Rose Garden on Tuesday
Pres. Obama gives an address on the Affordable Care Act from the Rose Garden on TuesdayWin McNamee/Getty Images

Almost half of likely voters in the United States are opposed to the individual mandate of the Affordable Care Act, the results of a new Rassmusen survey, released on Monday, show.

Forty-six percent are opposed to the mandate, while 40 percent said that the federal government should require every American to buy health insurance. Fourteen percent were undecided.

This is a four percent decrease in support of the mandate from February.

The survey also questioned respondents on their feelings about a single-payer health care system. Support for this has dropped as well, going from 40 percent in January to 36 percent in the newest survey.

Monday was the deadline for Americans to sign up for a healthcare plan on Healthcare.gov. According to Politico, up to 7 million people purchased a plan, which was the Obama administration's goal.

Some are questioning the accuracy of these numbers, such as Mark Thiessen, writing for the Washington Post.

Many of the people purchasing a plan may be people who originally had health insurance that was canceled due to the requirements of Obamacare, according to Thiessen.

“Recall that between 5 million and 6 million Americans lost their health plans because of Obamacare last fall. If the administration now succeeds in signing up 5 million to 6 million previously insured Americans, it will have achieved. . .nothing. Breaking even is no great accomplishment,” Thiessen writes.

“And let’s not forget: Many of those new Obamacare sign-ups are self-sufficient people who were previously paying their own way and now receive government subsidies for insurance. Creating government dependency is not progress — it’s a step backward.”

The Rasmussen survey was conducted from March 28-29 of 1,000 likely voters.