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Navy SEAL and wife busted trying to smuggle 10 kilograms of cocaine into U.S.

The 10 bricks of cocaine, wrapped in yellow tape and hidden underneath a sweater and a pair of boots, were discovered in the SEAL’s carry luggage on a flight from Aruba to Miami.
The 10 bricks of cocaine, wrapped in yellow tape and hidden underneath a sweater and a pair of boots, were discovered in the SEAL’s carry luggage on a flight from Aruba to Miami.
cbp.gov

Angel Martinez-Ramos, a Navy SEAL who served in active duty from 1999 – 2010, was busted on Christmas Eve 2013 along with his wife, Bibiana Marcela Lopez-Correa, attempting to smuggle 10 kilograms of cocaine into the U.S. from Aruba. The news of their arrests and the fact that Martinez-Ramos eventually pleaded guilty to conspiring to smuggle drugs into the U.S. was just released on May 3.

ABC News reported yesterday that Martinez-Ramos worked throughout Central and South America on official Navy business and was arrested in Miami trying to slip those 10 bricks of cocaine into the U.S. DEA agents working in Columbia were already on to the smuggling operation and identified Martinez-Ramos as a suspect in the next shipment of drugs to be brought through.

When Martinez-Ramos and his wife arrived in Miami back in December, the pair was detained by customs agents already on the lookout. But neither of them had any drugs on them. Agents eventually found some carry-on luggage left on the airplane containing the drugs. After questioning Martinez-Ramos and his wife, Lopez-Correa eventually admitted that the bag belonged to Martinez-Ramos. According to court documents:

The bag was filled with ten “brick shaped objects,” wrapped in yellow tape and hidden underneath a sweater and a pair of boots, the complaint said. The bricks turned out to be approximately 10 kilograms of cocaine.

The street value of those 10 bricks of cocaine was estimated at being worth up to $350,000. Later, when authorities searched Martinez-Ramos’ Hampton, Va. home, they discovered “grenades, firearms and almost 9,000 ammunition rounds,” according to News Oxy.

Under a plea deal arranged in March, Martinez-Ramos was able to plead guilty to the one charge of conspiracy to import a controlled substance, while charges of importing a controlled substance and intent to distribute a controlled substance were dropped. His wife has already entered her guilty plea and was sentenced to 70 months behind bars.

The former Navy SEAL went into the Reserves after leaving active duty in 2010. His duties in the Reserves often took him to Central and South America on “orders and official business.” Martinez-Ramos’ sentencing hearing is scheduled for later in May.