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Naming multiples

What is the best way to name multiples?
What is the best way to name multiples?
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Do your kids' names relate to each other in some way?  

There are a lot of ways to do it: starting each name with the same letter, choosing names that rhyme, picking a group of names with family history, giving each child a name with a similar meaning, etc.

Parents who choose linked names usually focus on the special bond among their children.  Other families, however, feel that a similarity in names might be detrimental to their children's feelings of independence and privacy.

What do you think?  And, if you are a multiple yourself, how do you feel about the names your parents chose?

Comments

  • Julie 5 years ago

    For my own twins, I chose unrelated names. Mine are boy/girl twins, which begs a new question: does it matter if the multiples are the same sex? or if they're identical?

  • Stephanie Duszynski 4 years ago

    My twins have unrelated names--and like Julie, mine are boy/girl fraternal twins. Honestly, I wanted to shy away from 'cutesy' matching names right away as soon as I knew I was expecting twins. I had my boy name picked out before I was even pregnant and then was a little disappointed that my first choice girl name started with the same letter (and thus I didn't want to use it).

    As my twins get older (they are almost 3 now), I am convinced we made the right decision. These kids could not be more different! I read once that fraternal twins would be no more alike than "regular" brothers and sisters and my kids have shown that to be true! :)

  • Michelle Tokheim 4 years ago

    Having had 50+ ultrasounds during my pregnancy, my identical twins were always referred to as "baby A" and "baby B". We decided on an A name and a B name. However, my husband and my father both are fraternal twins and their names start with the same letter as their twin (one set is boy/girl and one is boy/boy). I think having different sounding names helps people see them as individuals, not always as a set.