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Mount Pleasant teen is pushing for a law to protect dogs in pickup truck beds

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A Mount Pleasant, South Carolina teen is doing her best to push a law requiring a dog restraint law for dogs riding in the truck bed of a pickup, WYFF4 reported February 9.

Megan Herlihy, 16, went before the Mount Pleasant Town Council last week and presented the issue to a reluctant council. She plans to continue the battle for animal safety to protect the dogs in her community.

Megan is well aware of the danger to dogs traveling unrestrained in the back of a truck. Her neighbors' puppy was seriously injured in an incident eight years ago and had to be euthanized.

Mayor Linda Page is reluctant to pass an ordinance, even though her own golden retriever suffered a broken leg from a pickup incident. Mayor Page gave her hesitation stems from how this will likely turn into an enforcement issue, should an ordinance eventually be passed.

Megan isn't giving up the fight, and in a true animal advocate for her community.

There are several large dog owners in the Greenville area who routinely cart their pets around unrestrained in the truck bed. Photos have been placed on social media such as Facebook by concerned animal lovers, who watched horrified as the dog involved is often bounced from one side of the truck bed to the other.

Nothing can be done to those careless owners, who may not realize the danger their dog would face, should an accident occur. These owner's believe their dogs enjoy the ride, and either don't think of the danger involved, or simply don't want to acknowledge it exists.

In an accident, not only will the dog be turned into a fast moving missile that could injure or kill, it could also put others on the road in danger. As of now, there's no law against a dog riding unrestrained in the back of a truck.

For anyone who would like to assist Megan in her mission, the Mount Pleasant Town Council can be reached here.

How do the readers here feel? Is this a good idea, or would it be as hard to enforce as ordinance violations involving cell phones and texting? Please leave a comment and state how you feel.

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