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Most religious state is Mississippi, least religious is Vermont (Gallup poll)

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Religion was polled, state-by-state, by the well-known pollster Gallup, according to its web site on Monday, and Mississippi is still the most religious state in the United States. Sixty-one percent of the residents of Mississippi say that they are “very religious” which puts it one percent above the second ranking state of Utah where 60 percent of the residents say they are “very religious.”

On the other end of the list, of course, there are the least religious states in the United States. Once again, based on the percent of persons who responded to the survey saying that they are “very religious,” only 22 percent of the residents of Vermont said they are “very religious.” That puts Vermont at the bottom of the list as the least religious state. Vermont’s nearest competitor for last place on the list is New Hampshire where only 24 percent of those surveyed by Gallup said they are “very religious.”

Here are the lists of the most religious and the least religious states in the nation – followed by the percent of persons who say they are “very religious.”

Most Religious States: Top Ten

  • Mississippi (61 percent)
  • Utah (60 percent)
  • Alabama (57 percent)
  • Louisiana (56 percent)
  • South Carolina (54 percent)
  • Tennessee (54 percent)
  • Georgia (52 percent)
  • Arkansas (51 percent)
  • North Carolina (50 percent)
  • Oklahoma (49 percent)
  • Kentucky (49 percent)

Least Religious States: Bottom Ten

  • Vermont (22 percent)
  • New Hampshire (24 percent)
  • Maine (27 percent)
  • Massachusetts (28 percent)
  • Oregon (31 percent)
  • Nevada (32 percent)
  • Washington (32 percent)
  • Connecticut (32 percent)
  • Hawaii (32 percent)
  • District of Columbia (32 percent)

Overall, 41 percent of Americans say that religion is an important part of their daily lives and they attend religious services every week or almost every week. Twenty-nine percent of Americans say that religion is not a part of their daily lives and they rarely or never attend religious services.

Gallup held 174,000 interviews to obtain its survey results from January to December 2013.

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