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Moderates and RINOS fleeing Gov. Christie for vanilla Jeb Bush

Can the GOP beat Hillary with Jeb Bush?
Can the GOP beat Hillary with Jeb Bush?
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Move over Chris Christie, deep-pocketed GOP donors are now crossing over your politically wounded body to support former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, according to Friday’s New York Times.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had been sailing along as the Republican to beat for the presidential nomination in 2016 when he was hit with the George Washington Bridge scandal. Whether it was a Hillary Clinton-induced investigation or not, the one Republican ahead of the former secretary of state is now fading faster than cheap car seats.

Who better than Jeb Bush to pick up the pieces? A well-known moderate, he will appeal to the “RINO” segment of the GOP and other moderates. He comes from a large and strategic swing state – remember his brother’s 2000 Florida vote? Al Gore does.

Bush’s political momentum has begun to build in recent weeks. The aforementioned will not be supporters of Sen. Rand Paul or Sen. Ted Cruz, one a Libertarian and the other Tea Party.

Enter Jeb Bush who eases the stress of Christie donors now willing to move on to someone else more viable. Many of these wealthy individuals credit the Bush family with providing their notoriety in the political spectrum.

Barry Wynn, former chairman of the Republican Party in South Carolina as well as a George W. Bush fundraiser, put it best by saying, "They love the Bush family. They love the whole package, and they feel Jeb is just a part of the package."

Ironically, former New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman, a fellow Republican who endorsed Christie for governor, has altered her political stance with growing concerns whether the bridge scandal will damage Christie’s credibility.

Last spring, The Washington Post reported "powerful insiders and financiers" were courting Bush to run. In today’s politics, money is king and no one knows that better than Hillary Rodham Clinton and her vast campaign war chest.

Lawrence E. Bathgate II, a former finance chairman of the Republican National Committee and a major donor in New Jersey said, "Nobody is going to count anybody out or do anything to annoy a friend who is the governor of your state.” He described the ordeal as a "fraught decision."

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