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MIT graduate student Kaitlin Goldstein found dead: Fall cause of tragic death

MIT graduate student Kaitlin Goldstein has been found dead just a week after her disappearance in India. The young woman was in the country to take part in a workshop on energy and development at the Students’ Educational and Cultural Movement of Ladakh. She was taking a break from her studies when she fell to her death. The New York Daily News reported on her death on June 23.

Kaitlin Goldstein died after falling into a ravine during run
Kaitlin Goldstein died after falling into a ravine during run
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Goldstein is being remembered by those at MIT as a young woman that loved helping others. She didn't reach out for academic fame, according to one professor. She was at MIT studying toward a doctorate in architecture. At the age of 28, she was learning that she could use what she had learned to help those that lived in underdeveloped countries. After her time with the workshop in India ended, she planned to remain in the country to help install solar panels.

Kurt Teichert, a lecturer from Brown University that knew Goldstein, spoke about her after her death. He said the following, according to the Boston Globe: "When I first met Kate, she was waiting outside my Brown office as I arrived early in the morning. She was still in her running gear and had a dog at her side, as she often did any time I saw her outside of the classroom. She was full of ideas and questions about her growing interest in renewable energy, and she sought me out for guidance. Her impact on her classmates and me was immediate."

Goldstein died doing what she loved. She was out for a run on June 14, and she never returned to where she was staying. Her parents traveled to India after her disappearance, and they feared the worst. Her brother told one CBS News affiliate that he feared his sister had been kidnapped. He had heard about the gang rapes in India, and he feared his sister was the latest victim.

After her disappearance, the search began. The initial search involved those she was working and staying with, but soon the "Intelligence Bureau of India, the US Embassy in New Delhi, the Bureau of Consular Affairs at the US State Department, [and] the FBI" joined the search. MIT also hired a private security firm to help in the search.

Goldstein's body was found on Saturday. While out on her run, she fell on a loose rock, and she fell into a ravine. Goldstein was a competitive runner, so her death is even more shocking. She died immediately from the fall. At 28, Goldstein still had a full life ahead of her, and she planned to do good for the world. She was ready to take her knowledge and use it to help others. She was already doing that during her studies.

MIT President L. Rafael Reif did speak out about Goldstein's death. He sent out an email to MIT staff on Sunday. He said the following about Goldstein, according to News Oxy: "She was passionately interested in energy solutions for the developing world, a subject she was exploring in a remote region of northern India at the time of her death. The death of someone so young and promising is a terrible loss; we should all take time to reach out to those around us."

This young woman will be rememberd by all that knew her. This tragic end has taken someone with a bright future far too soon.