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Miley Cyrus talks kids, fame and growing up in new interview

For anyone paying attention, it's not exactly fresh information that Miley Cyrus has been working overtime to seem like a grown up. From her scandalous television appearances to her seemingly put on tough girl image, the former Disney starlet is doing her own thing, and she desperately wants the whole world to know it.

Recording artist Miley Cyrus (R) performs onstage during Miley Cyrus: MTV Unplugged at Sunset Gower Studios on January 28, 2014 in Hollywood, California.
Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for MTV
Recording artist Miley Cyrus (R) performs onstage during Miley Cyrus: MTV Unplugged at Sunset Gower Studios on January 28, 2014 in Hollywood, California.
Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for MTV

In a new story from 'W' magazine, the 21-year-old works overtime to insure that readers know she is totally independent, cool, and of legal drinking age. Of course, the first thing you'll notice about Miley from the photo spread is that the singer isn't wearing a stitch of clothing. It's a move lots of young women feel obligated to make somewhere along the way in the transition from child star to adult star. And it's nothing new for Miley Cyrus, who's been in the process of taking her clothes off for what seems like years.

No, the diminished shock value of naked Miley Cyrus isn't where the young woman is asserting her independence. That comes in the interview portion, starting with the singer's proclomation: "I don't love kids."

And the singer isn't talking about toddlers and infants, she's talking about her core fan base, a fact that becomes clear when she adds: "“They’re so f***ing mean … Sometimes I hear kids with their parents, and I want to go over and, like, smack them myself … Like if they meet me, they’ll be like, ‘Mom, don’t you know how to use an iPhone? Like, can you take the picture?’ I’m like, ‘Dude, if I ever talked to my mom like that when I was a kid, I would have had no phone, no computer, no TV, no anything.’ And so, yeah, kids are just mean.”

Later in the interview, the tween goddess confesses that she is no longer interested in making the music that earned her 17 million Twitter followers. She's interested in making her music (or her producer's music, but either way). "If no one buys my album, cool," the singer says. "It’s fine. I’ve got a house, and I’ve got dogs that I love. I don’t need anything else."

That doesn't mean that Miley Cyrus doesn't serve as an example to millions of teens. Just yesterday, Cyrus tweeted that it's been two months since her last cigarette. Accompanied by the hash tag "#proudofmyself," the tweet is an especially timely message to her legions of fans - whether Miley herself cares or not - since the World Health Organization's announcement that cancer cases are expected to start skyrocketing in the next decade.

Being an unintentional good example (at least some of the time) is all well and good, but Miley Cyrus is showing an odd distaste for her fame. In spite of her extremely active presence on social media, the star is less than enthusiastic about her celebrity.

First, there's her paranoid (but probably spot on) assertion that, "I think with, like, Instagram, Twitter, whatever, everyone is a paparazzi now. How scary is that? Like, you’re never safe.” Then, there's her claim that she never leaves her home. Of course, her home is palatial and stocked with amenities, but it's still something a little pitiful about feeling the need to be cooped up at home for fear of an entire world of smartphone stalkers.