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Michelle Nunn, David Perdue discuss various issues at Macon forum

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Macon-Bibb could play a pivotal role in who is Georgia's next U.S. Senator. With ten weeks left before the November 4 general election, Democrat Michelle Nunn and Republican David Perdue squared off in an August 21 forum which wasn't classified as a debate despite both being on the same stage together.

Thursday's forum in Macon-Bibb was hosted by the Georgia Chamber of Commerce and moderated by John Pruitt, a former news anchor for Atlanta's WSB-TV. Both Nunn and Perdue were asked to speak on four general topics: Affordable Care Act, transportation, defense spending and immigration. The forum was televised locally on WMAZ-TV.

Perdue, who has Central Georgia roots and grew up in nearby Houston County, has faced criticism for his business practices from Nunn in recent campaign ads that highlight a company called Pillowtex.

Subsequently, the Nunn campaign has begun playing a one-minute campaign commercial on local television station across the state and especially here in Macon which chronicles former mill workers from Kannapolis, N.C., telling the story of David Perdue’s brief stint at the textile firm. Pillowtex went bankrupt shortly after he left.

At the candidate forum, Nunn touted her past experiences with former President George W. Bush-- a Republican-- and her tenure with Bush's Points of Light Foundation. Nunn proudly stated the following: " I know what it means to take an organization from a couple of thousand dollars to $30 million. I worked side-by-side to problem solve and that's what we need in Washington.

Nunn was critical of Perdue in regard to his ability to work side-by-side with people who have different viewpoints, especially in the U.S. Senate. After a Perdue runoff victory over U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston he told supporters some of his plans if he were to be elected Georgia's next U.S. Senator.

"With my business career, I will prosecute the failed record of the last six years of (President) Barack Obama.", explains Perdue.

If Republicans are able to retain the House of Representatives and win control of the Senate, impeachment proceedings against President Barack Obama, the country's first African-American president, could occur.

The Republican-led House approved a resolution in late July authorizing Speaker John Boehner to sue President Barack Obama over claims he abused his powers at the expense of Congress and the Constitution.The vote was 225-201.

Republicans argue Obama's executive orders in a number of areas were unlawful because it's the job of Congress to make or change laws. But they believe his handling of the Affordable Care act gives them the best chance at proving their case, and are basing the suit on that issue.

Michelle Nunn is very likely to win Bibb County in November. However, turnout in Macon-Bibb will determine the margin Ms. Nunn will win by. Even though some candidates such as Perdue aren't hesitant in harshly criticizing President Obama and others may avoid President Obama on issues, Obama is still very popular here in Macon-Bibb.

Can Michelle Nunn receive a presidential turnout in Macon-Bibb and either match or exceed the number of votes Obama has received in two wins (2008, 2012) by twenty percentage (or more) points over his Republican opponents?

Perdue knows he is not likely to win Macon-Bibb, and is hoping that a lower Democratic turnout will limit a big victory of twenty percentage or more in a county such as Macon-Bibb. WMAZ-TV political analyst Clif Wilkinson says Perdue needs to avoid major mistakes which would increase his chances of winning. Wilkinson states the following:

"He needs not to make a mistake. He's got to be very careful not to put his foot in his mouth, not to say something that's completely unbelievable that would come across as very negative or derogatory," he said.

Wilkinson also commented that Nunn needs to find a way to get her message across and fire up voters."Nunn cannot win this race without getting a number of Democrats to show up at the polls."

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