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Meth lab discovered at senior retirement community: Shocks police and residents

In a scene that could have come right out of "Breaking Bad" a 64-year-old man living in a California retirement community was operating a meth lab, shocking even the police who arrested him. Robert Short of Fresno was stopped for a traffic violation and when police ran his name in their data base it was discovered he was out of prison on supervised release for selling meth, according to International Business News on June 17.

Police find a meth lab in a senior retirement community, shocking police and residents.
Wikimedia Commons

Police searched Short's car and found four ounces of meth, a scale and plastic bags. This led to a search of Short's home and investigators found that he had all the makings for a meth lab, along with a half of a pound of crystal meth. The meth had a street value of about $1,700, according to USA Today.

In Short's senior housing unit they also found some heroin along with other paraphernalia that indicated he had his own drug business going. This enterprising senior citizen had found away to keep himself in business, which shocked his neighbors. No one at the housing community had an inkling this is what he was up to.

The online world is comparing Short to a "real-life Walter White" from the show "Breaking Bad." In this show a high school chemistry teacher starts his own meth lab when finding he has terminal cancer.

Fresno Police Lt. Joe Gomez said it was "Just shocking someone that age would do that, but actually it is a perfect place to do it right? Retirement Village, who would suspect it going on there?"

He's right that is probably the last place you'd expect someone to set up a meth lab. The odor that is created when making crystal meth is fairly strong, so either the folks around him didn't notice or he was able to mask it in some way.

Short is facing several drug charges and was booked into the Fresno County jail. His next court date is pending. Neighbors at the retirement community said they didn't know Short and that he mostly kept to himself.