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Measles vaccine cures woman of multiple myelomas

Doctors at the Mayor Clinic injected Stacy Erholtz with enough measles vaccine to inoculate 10 million people.
Doctors at the Mayor Clinic injected Stacy Erholtz with enough measles vaccine to inoculate 10 million people.
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Stacy Erholtz is a walking miracle after her metasticzed cancer went into full remission thanks to the measles vaccine. Erholtz, 50, of Pequot Lakes, MN was out of options for conventional treatments for her blood cancer, when she agrees to be part of a new trial at the Mayor Clinic, where they inoculated her with enough measles vaccine to treat “10 million” people.

“It’s a landmark,”Dr. Stephen Russell, a professor of molecular medicine, who headed the Mayo Clinic research told the Minneapolis Star Tribune. “We’ve known for a long time that we can give a virus intravenously and destroy rampant cancer in mice. But this is the first time we have proven it could also be done in humans. It was the easiest treatment by far with very few side effects. I hope it's the future of treating cancer infusion." He also noted that the measles vaccine has an “uncanny affinity for certain tumors.”

Although there is now no trace of the cancer in Erholtz’s body, a second trial subject, whose cancer was confined to her leg muscles, did not meet with the same success, and her cancer returned after nine months The next step is to see whether the measles vaccine treatment will work in more test subjects, with additional trials expected to begin by the fall. In the meantime, readers can read Russell’s full report in the online journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings for more information.