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Mark Wahlberg & 'Transformers: Age of Extinction' costars reboot the robot movie

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The action flick "Transformers: Age of Extinction" (directed by Michael Bay) begins after an epic battle left a great city torn, but with the world saved. As humanity picks up the pieces, a shadowy group reveals itself in an attempt to control the direction of histor, while an ancient, powerful new menace sets Earth in its crosshairs. With help from a new cast of humans, including mechanic Cade Yeager (played by Mark Wahlberg), Optimus Prime and the Autobots rise to meet their most fearsome challenge yet. In an incredible adventure, they are swept up in a war of good and evil, ultimately leading to a climactic battle across the world.

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Other cast members of "Transformers: Age of Extinction" include Nicola Peltz as Cade's daughter, Tessa; Jack Reynor as Shane Dyson, Tessa’s boyfriend; Kelsey Grammer as CIA director Harold Attinger; and Stanley Tucci as wealthy businessman Joshua Joyce. Bay and the other members of the "Transformers" team have insisted that "Transformers: Age of Extinction" is not a sequel to the first three "Transformers" former movies. Instead, "Transformers: Age of Extinction" (released in 3-D and IMAX) is a reboot in the series. Here is what Walhberg, Grammer and Tucci had to say about "Transformers: Age of Extinction" while they were filming the movie.

Interview With Mark Wahlberg

What can you say about your Cade Yeager character?

Wahlberg: My focus is the human element, the relationship with [Cade’s] daughter, the dilemma of realizing that she has been dishonest with me and has been in this relationship for quite some time and it’s all kind of thrust upon me while we’re on the run and trying to survive.

Cade’s motivations in “Transformers: Age of Extinction”?

Wahlberg: What’s happened with [Cade’s] daughter and his best friend (played by T.J. Miller) is that they’re getting a little frustrated with me pursuing my fantasy dream of being an inventor and discovering the next great thing. So when I come upon this truck, the first instinct is to get rid of this thing and get the reward. I don’t think they understand and nobody understands the ramifications of trying to keep a truck like this and what the government will do to anybody who’s holding on to the vehicle or Transformer.

My whole philosophy behind it is, “If I can just study it and figure out how they work and apply those things to my own inventions …” They’re just not having it. Yeah, he has good intentions of making this phone call and turning this truck in, because there is a reward for found Transformers, but once I’m dishonest about the fact that I’m hiding this truck, it just goes south really quickly.

What attracted you to “Transformers: Age of Extinction”?

Wahlberg: It’s the first time I’ve made a movie that my kids were excited that I was a part of, but I really did it because of Michael [Bay]. We had such a great experience working the first time on “Pain & Gain.” I love the way he works.

I love everything about the experience. I love that I get to work with one of the most talented in the business. And having aspirations to hopefully direct my own film in the future, who better to learn from and watch?

What was it like working with Nicola Peltz and Jack Reynor?

Wahlberg: When [Michael Bay] told me he was interested in Nicola, I was really excited about that, because I’ve known her since she was probably 13. I’m very good friends with her dad and the rest of her family. I knew we would have great chemistry. I knew the kind of work ethic she would bring to the table.

And the great thing about them is that they’re really focused on doing good work. She doesn’t want to be a movie star. She wants to be a good actress. And she’s really focused and really committed to doing the job. Jack is really focused. It’s nice to see kids that are really prepared and excited about doing this sort of thing.

What did you think of the size and scope of “Transformers: Age of Extinction”?

Wahlberg: I continue to be in awe of the scope and size of the movie and what it takes to keep this whole thing running and how on top of it Michael is when it comes to every aspect of it. The first movie we made [“Pain & Gain”] was really small. You can see how he managed every aspect of the film singlehandedly. But now, with this and the size and scope of it, it’s pretty overwhelming.

Interview With Kelsey Grammer

What can you say about your Harold Attinger character?

Grammer: Harold Attinger, for the last five years or so, has been pursuing aliens, Decepticons and Autobots. That’s his job. He’s pretty intent on making sure that that’s going to be followed through to its fruition.

How would you describe Harold Attinger’s relationship with Cemetery Wind field leader James Savoy (played by Titus Welliver)?

Grammer: Savoy and I are twinned in spirit in what we’re trying to do — and that is to make sure that we’re protecting our planet and working for the United States of America. Depending on your aspect, that’s either a good thing or a bad thing, but we’re both on the good team, as far as we’re concerned. He and I have worked together for years. I recruited him to head the special ops force that I activate or call into action whenever there’s a rogue alien spotted.

What are your thoughts on playing a villain?

Grammer: It’s just as much fun to play a bad guy as it is to play a good guy. It may be a little bit more delicious when he’s particularly bad. Attinger is one of those guys.

Were you a fan of the “Transformers” franchise before you did this movie?

Grammer: I love these movies. I said yes because it’s fantastic. And I’m a bad guy. There’s something appealing about that.

These movies are wonderful; they’re epic. I’m heroic evil in this film. And there’s heroic good. And when they come together, that’s inherently dramatic and fun.

What is it like to work with Michael Bay?

Grammer: I like this thing that people call “Bayhem.” It sort of applies to the way he works. And all the people who work on his films are really ecstatic about it. “I’m going to change the shot. Let’s do this instead.” I love that.

Interview With Stanley Tucci

What can you say about your Joshua Joyce character?

Tucci: He’s one of the wealthiest men in the world, one of the most successful businessmen in the world. And I guess he cracked the genome of the Transformers. He’s figured out how to create them, how to build them, how to birth them. But eventually, that ends up getting him in trouble.

What is it like to work with Michael Bay?

Tucci: He’s very spontaneous. He’ll do more shots before lunch than most directors will do in three days. And they’re all kind of amazing shots. It keeps you on your toes, which I really like.

There’s improvisation, but you also are sticking to the script. He’ll throw stuff out of the window and bring new stuff in the front door. As an actor, it’s very exciting. And also, as somebody who’s directed movies, it’s really fun to watch somebody work like that.

How would you describe the action sequences in "Transformers: Age of Extinction"?

Tucci: Once we started shooting outside the Hong Kong set in Detroit, I’d never experience anything like that, because there were explosions going off, the likes of which I’d never seen before. There’s a sequence that Michael did in one day that it would take most directors a week to do.

What did you think of the look and style of "Transformers: Age of Extinction"?

Tucci: The technology has changed so quickly that they’re going to be able do stuff in this film that they weren’t able to do in the other [“Transformers”] films or that they weren’t even able to do six months ago. I think it will be amazing. I think it will also be beautiful-looking.

For more info: "Transformers: Age of Extinction" website

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