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Many of us place an high level of importance on our jobs and careers. For some p

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Many of us place an high level of importance on our jobs and careers. For some people, their lives are their jobs and careers. Whatever the case, this comes as no surprise.

Most people work an eight-hour day or some variation that adds up to a 40-hour week. A day is, of course, 24 hours. Since we spend about 7-8 hours sleeping and from 30 minutes to, in some cases, four hours per day commuting, we therefore spend most of our waking life in a job with co-workers.

For those with any type of longevity in a job, it is pretty evident how important this becomes and how many times our co-workers can become like a second family, or even our most important peer group. In other cases, our co-workers become a second or surrogate family.

Considering the amount of our waking lives that we spend at work, it is also not surprising that our identity ultimately becomes enmeshed with our work. Consider how will typically out in a lot of effort to look their best at work, whether it is a formal environment demanding suits or more casual allowing workers to wear jeans. Across thespectrum, it can be a fashion show.

Edward A. Dreyfus, a clinical psychologist, writes that a job becomes somethingbmore than just a way to earn money and survive (http://www.docdreyfus.com/psychologically-speaking/no-job-no-identity). Men, especially, see their jobs as an expression of their masculinity. Not only is akin who they are, but also what they are.

Additionally, when people are working there is a subliminal sense that they are contributing to society (http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/columnist/kay/2013/08/31/at-work-sel...). That gives them a sense if worth that they are an integral part society and further boosts their self-esteem.

Perhaps there are those among us who would be surprised by al this.any of us may not even be aware of how much emphasis about whobwwhiner feel we are is so innately defined by how we make a living.

Now jobs are very important. We need to be conscientious about song our jobs well because after all, we are being paid to do that.

It becomes a mental health issue when our jobs become who we are. It becomes a problem when that's al that we are.

It is very important that are able to see who we are as people, not as workers. These days, things change. What happens when we lose a.job? We end up losing a.part iif es as well, and in some cases a very big part.

Nevertheless, it is very important that we establish a sense of self-worth that is nit dependent on what we do for a living. The reason for this is pretty self-evident.

If we were to lose our job, or if we're an entrepreneur and our business fails, of course we will be disappointed and grieve. If our identity is not so tied up in the business, it is a lot easier for us to recover and move on.

The key, then is to develop a sense of self that is independent of what we are and what we do. We focus on who we are. We develop that relationship with ourselves by writing in a journal or some other method that allows us to get to know ourselves. This way we develop an appreciation and unconditional love for ourselves.

This way, we are better able to handle challenges from a problem-solving perspective rather than being overwhelmed by the despair of feeling like we lost our identity.

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