Skip to main content

See also:

Man shot to death: Family and friends seek answers after woman killed by police

Atlanta police are investigating the murder of a man and GBI is investigating the deadly shooting of a armed and distraught woman by Henry County police.
Atlanta police are investigating the murder of a man and GBI is investigating the deadly shooting of a armed and distraught woman by Henry County police.
Stock Photo

A man was shot to death Saturday afternoon in southwest Atlanta, and police are trying to determine who shot the man and why.

The Fulton County Medical Examiner’s Office said they know the name of the victim, but have declined to release his identity until his next of kin is notified.

Around 2:45 p.m., officers responded to 691 University Ave. after getting a report of a person shot, according to Atlanta police. When they arrived they found the victim with a gunshot wound to the head, police spokesman Officer John Chafee said.

The man was transported to Grady Memorial Hospital where he died from his injuries, Chafee said.

So far, police have not released any details on the circumstances surrounding the shooting and whether there were any witnesses. It’s also unclear what the victim was doing in the area.

Family Members and Friends Seek Answers After Distraught Woman Killed By Police

Police on Friday have identified the distraught woman who was killed by police after she made three 911 hang up calls in Henry County. And family members are now trying to find out what happened.

The woman has been identified as 37-year-old Lori Knowles, but the cause of her death is still under investigation, according to Henry County police. Officials are waiting on the histology and toxicology reports from the GBI, spokesman Lt. Joey Smith said. Those reports could take six to eight weeks, officials said.

James Bell, of Lithia Springs, said his niece was a loving person, according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

“We’re still seeking information as to what took place and why Lori is no longer with us,” Bell said during a phone interview Friday afternoon. “We want to know how a 911 call for help turns into police having to shoot.”

Knowles was shot around 4:30 p.m. when officers were dispatched to the home on Cobb Court in Hampton in reference to a “trouble unknown – 911 hang up call,” Smith said. Dispatchers said the distraught woman made three calls to 911, but each time the calls were disconnected. Officers arrived to hear a woman screaming inside the home and forced entry, Smith said.

“When entering the home the officers made contact with the distraught and crying female armed with a handgun," Smith said. “Officer's made several attempts to have the female drop the weapon and one of officers was forced to fire upon the female, striking her once.”

She was dead by the time her husband, who also called 911, arrived at the home, police said.

A man who lived next door said Knowles as a “good neighbor” from a stable family, which he said made her death bizarre, shocking and incomprehensible, the AJC reported.

“The cops have never been over to their house — this is totally out of blue,” Timothy Pangburn told the paper. “She was home alone and she was having some sort of episode. That is what is so confusing.”

Pangburn, 28, said he fished with the woman and her husband, and the two families watched each other’s homes when the other was out of town.
Pangburn said his wife, Sarah, saw two officers breaking in the door. Soon afterward, more patrol cars converged on the scene.
“She didn’t hear anything. Not a scream, not a gunshot,” Pangburn said. “It was completely quiet.”

Pangburn said Knowles worked from home. He knew of no mental health problems from which Knowles may have suffered and had no clue to what may have caused the reported screaming. To the contrary, he said, they saw her as a “normal person,” from a stable family. And their presence had always made him feel more secure, Pangburn told the AJC.

“They were a very gun safety family,” he said. “He is very knowledgeable with guns and she was as well. They were both well trained at it.”