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Man gets 30 years for having kiddie porn

Project Safe Childhood
Project Safe Childhood
US Department of Justice

A San Joaquin Valley man turned over to federal authorities by Google was sentenced to 30 years in prison for one count of possession and distribution of child pornography, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced Monday. Alan Kendrick, 47, of the Stanislaus County community of Escalon will then face a lifetime of supervised release if he lives long enough to leave prison.

Google suspected Kendrick of having six pornographic images of children on a Google account, and turned the information over to authorities in December 2013, according to prosecutors.

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children turned the case over to the Ceres Police Department, prosecutors said. A detective with the police department investigated and found the account had been access from residences in Escalon and Modesto.

Kendrick was found to be a registered sex offender who wore a GPS tracking device. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Division of Adult Parole Violations was brought into the case, as were the Sacramento High Tech Crimes Task Force, and the Modesto Federal Bureau of Investigation Office.

When arraigned in March 2014, Kendrick was ordered detained as a flight risk, and as a danger to the community. He entered a plea of guilty in May.

Kendrick entered into a plea agreement admitting possessing and distributing pornographic images of children. He also "admitted that he had engaged in a pattern of abuse or exploitation of a minor," according to prosecutors.

“This case is another example of the successful partnership among the corporate, nonprofit, and law enforcement community,” said Supervisory Special Agent Todd Irinaga of the Sacramento FBI’s Modesto office in a statement issued Monday by the Sacramento Division of the FBI.

The overall effort to bring child pornographers to justice is part of the federal Project Safe Childhood, which helps coordinate efforts among federal, state, regional, county and city law enforcement personnel. The program began in 2006.