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Malaysia Airlines missing plane update: Was Flight 370 hijacked, shot down?

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The Malaysia missing plane Flight 370 is still missing after three weeks, and with Malaysia Airlines and Malaysian officials continuing to change their information, it is time for the international community to ask the question whether Malaysia’s missing plane was hijacked and then shot down. According to an updated report by Reuters on April 1, the latest changes provided by Malaysian officials are the last words that were spoken by the captain or the co-pilot of Flight MH370.

“Malaysia on Tuesday released the full transcript of communications between the Boeing 777 and local air traffic control before it dropped from civilian radar in the early hours of March 8 as it flew from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.”

In regard to Malaysia’s missing plane, it took Malaysian officials three weeks to release the transcript of the final transcript between Flight MH370 and local air traffic control? And authorities still need to conduct a “forensic examination of the actual recording” to determine whether the final words "Good night, Malaysian Three Seven Zero" were said by the captain or the co-pilot?

The final words communicated from Flight MH370 are only one of the many inconsistencies that have been provided by Malaysian authorities, specifically Malaysian Acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein who happens to be the man in charge of overseeing the air force investigation into the missing plane. Hussein did not provide any explanation for the changes in the reported last communication.

“Minutes after the final radio transmission was received the plane's communications were cut off and it turned back across Peninsular Malaysia and headed towards the Indian Ocean, according to military radar and limited satellite data.”

In regard to the Malaysia missing plane, Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, the only consistency that has been provided so far to the international community are the inconsistencies reported by Hussein and other Malaysian officials. Just a few days after the March 8 disappearance of Flight MH370, Malaysia confirmed that “a passenger jet missing since last week was hijacked.” “It’s conclusive,” a Malaysian official said. Planes do not fall off the radar or are left untracked in today’s world of terrorism. Now, after another two weeks, Malaysia is calling the investigation into the missing plane a “criminal investigation” again. The only question is -- who are the criminals? Just a few more days, and “time is running out because the signal transmitted by the missing aircraft's black box will die about 30 days after a crash due to limited battery life, leaving investigators with a vastly more difficult task.” Is that Malaysia’s real intent with all its inconsistencies -- to buy time in order to hide the truth?

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