Skip to main content

See also:

Louie Gohmert endorses anti-gay bill challenging "religion of secularism"

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX)
Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX)AP Photo

Speaking on February 26th, 2014 with theocratic (but still not Senegalese) talk show host Janet Mefferd, Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) endorsed Arizona's controversial "right to discriminate bill" for challenging the "religion of secularism."

There is, of course, no such thing, but just as American fundamentalists believe they can disguise their push for theocracy as defending religious liberty, they also believe they can disguise non-religion as a religion.

Gohmert began with the former talking point, arguing that the law would uphold constitutional principles (even though similar laws have already been found unconstitutional), followed by his insistence that non-religion counts as a religion.

"These are religious beliefs and how have we gotten so far afield from the Constitution that we say, well if you're not willing to embrace the liberal beliefs that we have then your religious beliefs are not protected," said Gohmert. "It doesn't say that in the Frist Amendment, it avoids the establishment of a religion. Well some are establishing the religion of secularism and everybody else's religion has just got to basically go to blazes."

Back in reality, of course, the beliefs of the religious are not being challenged; only their attempts to push their beliefs into law.

Gohmert also claimed President Obama would have lost the 2008 election if he had supported marriage equality then, ignoring polls that show more than 50% of Americans supporting marriage equality.

"Let's face it," said Gohmert, "if the president had said he believed marriage was between two men and two women back when he and McCain were being interviewed in California, he would never have won the first election. But he changed his stated belief and that got him elected and once in it's easier to get re-elected to a second term."

Gohmert's war against reality is still as futile as ever.