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Lawrence of Arabia part of TCM's 100th anniversary of the start of World War I

Lawrence of Arabia poster
Lawrence of Arabia poster
Columbia

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is marking the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I this July with a weekly collection of films about the devastating conflict.

Hosted in primetime by retired U.S. Army General Wesley Clark, Friday Night Spotlight: 100th Anniversary of World War I reflects views of the first World War as seen by filmmakers through the decades. The film for Friday, July 18 at 8 p.m. (ET) is the Academy Award winner 'Lawrence of Arabia' (1962). David Lean's Lawrence of Arabia (1962) follows the colorful real-life exploits of T.E. Lawrence (Peter O'Toole), the flamboyant British officer who fought with Arabs in their revolt against the Turks during WWI.

TCM's look back at World War I not only includes the primetime lineup but also the entire 24-hour lineup each Friday. Among the more than 40 films included in the lineup is Lewis Milestone's All Quiet on the Western Front (1930), which makes a powerful anti-war statement from the perspective of a young German soldier (Lew Ayres). Stanley Kubrick's Paths of Glory (1957) tells the dramatic story of a French colonel (Kirk Douglas) who goes against his better judgment in following orders to lead his men in a suicide mission against the Germans. And Peter Weir's Gallipoli (1981) tells of two idealistic young friends (one of them played by Mel Gibson) who join the Australian Army during the war and fight in Turkey in the ill-fated Battle of Gallipoli.

Retired General Wesley Clark is a veteran of 34 years in the Army and the Department of Defense. A winner of the Silver Star for his service in Vietnam, Clark later commanded Operation Allied Force in the Kosovo Air Campaign during his term as the Supreme Allied Commander and Commander in Chief of the U.S. European Command.

Friday, July 18
6 a.m. – J'Accuse (1919)
9 a.m. – Today We Live (1933)
11 a.m. – A Farewell to Arms (1932)
12:30 a.m. – Stamboul Quest (1934)
2 a.m. – Ever in My Heart (1933)
3:15 a.m. – British Intelligence (1940)
4:30 a.m. – Dark Journey (1937)
6 a.m. – Rendezvous (1935)
8 p.m. – Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
Midnight – Gallipoli (1981)
2 a.m. – Grand Illusion (1937)
4 a.m. – King & Country (1964)