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L’Oréal Paris announces the results of the It’s THAT Worth It™ Safe Sun Survey

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Actress Diane Keaton, the star of Looking for Mr. Goodbar and Annie Hall, fought and won a battle with skin cancer at age 21. Today Keaton is a skin cancer survivor asking women to join a nationwide effort to prevent skin cancer.

The It’s THAT Worth It™ Safe Sun Survey was commissioned by L’Oréal Paris, in partnership with the Melanoma Research Alliance, to continue to raise awareness for It’s THAT Worth It, a public health call-to-action that urges women of all skin tones to prevent melanoma by using sunscreen and to help save lives by supporting cutting-edge melanoma research for a cure.

The survey shows 52 percent of American women grade themselves a C or lower on their suncare habits. And, while people of all skin tones are at risk of melanoma, many African American women (36% vs. 39% in 2013) and Hispanic women (23% vs. 31% in 2013) continue to grade themselves a D or F.

The survey reveals that far more women believe they merit an A grade when it comes to taking care of their teeth (50%) or eyes (31%) rather than suncare (21%). And while 94 percent of women have heard of melanoma, and more than half of them believe it’s a serious or potentially deadly condition, less than three in 10 (26%) know that they should apply sunscreen all the time, not just in the summer or when they are exposed to direct sunlight.

Along with Keaton, the campaign, which launched on April 8th, leverages celebrity spokespeople Eva Longoria, Aimee Mullins, Lea Michele, and L’Oréal Paris executive and melanoma survivor Danielle Macaluso in a series of broadcast and print public service announcements and I DO IT™ video, as well as the It’s THAT Worth It™ Thunderclap.

“I was diagnosed with skin cancer at age 21 but that is nothing compared to Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer especially among women under 40. I hope you can join me in a nationwide effort to prevent this killer by visiting ItsTHATworthit.org,” Keaton said.

The survey reveals that far more women believe they merit an A grade when it comes to taking care of their teeth (50%) or eyes (31%) rather than suncare (21%). And while 94 percent of women have heard of melanoma, and more than half of them believe it’s a serious or potentially deadly condition, less than three in 10 (26%) know that they should apply sunscreen all the time, not just in the summer or when they are exposed to direct sunlight.

The It’s THAT Worth It™ Safe Sun Online Survey was commissioned by L’Oréal Paris, in partnership with the Melanoma Research Alliance, to continue to raise awareness for It’s THAT Worth It, a public health call-to-action that urges women of all skin tones to prevent melanoma by using sunscreen and to help save lives by supporting cutting-edge melanoma research for a cure.

In addition to the survey, L’Oréal Paris will unveil the I DO IT™ video on ItsTHATworthit.org, featuring the campaign’s celebrity ambassadors. The video shows how they do it by wearing sunscreen every day and asks customers to wear sunscreen and join the movement.

Thunderclap has reached 66 percent of its goal but supporter are being told that unless the goal is met the Thunderclap will not be heard. L'Oréal Paris will make a donation to MRA of $1 for each supporter who signs up for the Thunderclap and $1 for each L’Oréal Paris Advanced Suncare product sold in the U.S. -- up to $250,000 in 2014 (the campaign excludes the State of Mississippi). This support is part of a three-year, $750,000 donation by L’Oréal Paris funding MRA research that explores melanoma susceptibility, development and progression.

The It’s THAT Worth It™ Safe Sun Online Survey was conducted within the United States by Kelton Global on behalf of L’Oréal Paris from April 3 – 9, 2014 among 987 women: 505 nationally representative American women, with oversampling to reach 311 African-American women and 311 Hispanic women, all ages 18 and older. For the sample of nationally representative American women, the chances are 95 in 100 that a survey result does not vary, plus or minus, by more than 4.4 percentage points from the result that would be obtained if interviews had been conducted with all persons in the universe represented by the sample. For the samples of Hispanic women and African-American women, the chances are 95 in 100 that a survey result does not vary, plus or minus, by more than 5.6 percentage points from the result that would be obtained if interviews had been conducted with all persons in the universe represented by the sample. In all surveys, the margin of error for any subgroups will be slightly higher.

For more information go to: www.lorealparisusa.com.

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