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Kyle Busch Motorsports fails another post-race inspection

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The No. 51 Kyle Busch Motor Sports Toyota race winning truck from the American Ethanol 200 at Iowa Speedway in Newton on Friday night failed post-race inspection for the second race in a row. In Iowa, Erik Jones drove the truck to his first-career Truck Series win. The truck was driven to victory lane by owner Kyle Busch two weeks earlier at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta.

Jones dominated the Iowa race, leading 131 laps of the 200 that made up the event on his way to the win. In post-race inspection, though, the truck was determined to be too low in the rear.

"It was close," crew chief Eric Phillips said. "Not sure right now, but we'll look at everything. Obviously, it wasn't anything intentional, but we'll look into it. It's a rough race track and just not a situation we want to be in, but we'll have to see what happens on the first of the week when we get home and look over it."

After Busch won the Kentucky race a couple weeks ago, the No. 51 truck was found to be too low in the front during post-race inspection. As a result of that infraction, Phillips was fined $5,000 and Busch was docked six owner points. Busch does not earn driver points in the Truck Series, so there were no driver points from which to deduct.

"The Kentucky deal is completely a different thing," Phillips said. "We were probably pushing tolerances there, but that's our job to do, but here, it wasn't that, by no means. We'll just have to figure it out Monday and see what happens."

A penalty announcement resulting from the Iowa inspection failure will probably come on Tuesday.

Busch addressed the issue while at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon for Nationwide and Sprint Cup competition and likened the issue to one suffered by JR Motorsports' No. 9 Nationwide team earlier in the year.

"We're having the same issue that the 9 car had earlier this year with being able to maintain heights," Busch said. "After the race, there's a tolerance of a window of, I think, a quarter inch that you're allowed in green."

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