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King Tut burial mystery with erect penis and black liquid possibly explained

Reasons have now surfaced for some of King Tut's burial anomalies
Reasons have now surfaced for some of King Tut's burial anomalies
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Ever since King Tutankhamun’s (better known as King Tut) tomb was discovered in 1922 by Howard Carter, it has yielded answers to many mysteries of ancient Egypt and posed a few more. Many of Tut’s fans don’t know it, but he was buried with an erect penis and covered in some type of black liquid. Now, according to the Huffington Post on Jan. 3, a possible explanation has been proposed.

Egyptologist Salima Ikram has speculated that these burial anomalies, unseen in any other mummy to date, may have been performed for religious reasons.

King Tut’s father is believed to have been the pharaoh Akhenaten. Akhenaten attempted to drastically change the Egyptian monarchy, including changing the worship of Egyptians from the many animal-headed gods to the sun disc, Aten. He even destroyed images of other gods, a rare sacrilege at the time. History claims that the boy king Tutankhamun was attempting to undo his father’s changes.

The burial with an erect penis and covered in black liquid may have been an attempt to show kinship between King Tut and the old gods, especially making him look like Osiris, god of the underworld. He was also buried with a heart scarab in place of his removed heart. These traits harken back to the story of Osiris, how he was cut to pieces by his brother Set and his heart buried. You can read the full story of Osiris HERE.

Tutankhamun is shown as a fully-fledged Osiris — not simply a wrapped mummy," Ikram noted. "This representation of the king as Osiris is unique in the Valley of the Kings: Other tombs show the king being embraced by Osiris or offering to him."

Salima Ikram is a professor at American University in Cairo, Egypt. While allowing that this is a theory and can never be fully proven, it’s intriguing that the first person to suggest Tutankhamun was embalmed to look like Osiris was Howard Carter in 1925.