Skip to main content

See also:

Kickstarter under hacker attack

It is being reported this morning, February 16, 2014, by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that Kickstarter is now the latest victim in the surge of cyber-attacks that now include Forbes, Comcast, Snapchat, and of course, the Target Corporation from Christmas 2013. This popular crowdfunding website has not yet confirmed how many people were affected or the depth of the security breach.

An email was released to all Kickstarter users by CEO Yancy Strickler which stated,

"No credit card data of any kind was accessed by the hackers" and that "There is no evidence of unauthorized activity of any kind on your account."

The email also highly recommended that all users should immediately change their passwords. The trouble with this notion is that it gives the Kickstarter community a false sense of security. Changing passwords is completely useless against today’s new breed of cybercriminal.

Keylogging theft is running rampant, but the general public is almost completely unaware of how much at-risk we truly are. A hacker simply installs a secret software onto our computers, laptops, and smartphones which captures every single button that is typed into the keyboard. This means that when we change our passwords, the cyber-hackers are actually watching us change them in real-time. What is truly needed is an anti-keylogging software that blocks these criminals completely.

And it is not only our desktops and laptops that are at risk. Nearly 70% of all online searches now begin from our digital smartphones. The popularity of digital apps has been rising at an alarming rate in the past 18 months and is only expected to increase. This means that our cell phones will soon become the primary target for these cyber-attacks.

StrikeForce Technologies is expected to release two new anti-keylogging programs next week, February 24 – 28, 2014, that are specifically patented to protect our mobile devices against this type of hacking breach. This StrikeForce is one of the only security software companies to date who actually have a patented program for mobile phones, according to Techsonian.com.