Skip to main content

See also:

Kenny Chesney fights back against use of palm tree logo

Kenny Chesney says 'no more' to company selling unauthorized merchandise
Kenny Chesney says 'no more' to company selling unauthorized merchandise
Rick Diamond, Getty Images

Kenny Chesney has filed a lawsuit over the unauthorized use of his logo. If you’ve ever purchased Kenny Chesney merchandise, you’ve probably seen the logo, which features a palm tree with a guitar leaning against it. The logo has been used on Kenny Chesney t-shirts, sunglasses, beach towels and more. Now that logo is the subject of a lawsuit.

According to the Tennessean, a lawsuit was filed against T&M Enterprises when the company began selling merchandise bearing Kenny Chesney’s logo, without permission. The company was given a deadline to stop selling the imprinted items, but when the deadline passed and the merchandise was still being produced and sold, Kenny Chesney’s camp had had enough.

A spokesperson for Kenny Chesney stated, “We realized that, in fact, the defendant had no intention of honoring the agreement. Regrettably, we were forced into taking further legal action. The details of our complaint are provided in the lawsuit filed in Nashville.”

Trademarked logos such as the guitar and palm tree design are the property of the owner. It is illegal to sell trademarked merchandise without permission. It appears this case is pretty straightforward, so hopefully it will be settled quickly and Kenny Chesney can get back to singing about beautiful islands, instead of defending them.

Chat about this and other country music news on Facebook at Dirt Road Rendezvous or follow @JaelynJamik on Twitter or Pinterest! For even more news about your favorite country music stars, click here or receive spam-free email updates by clicking Subscribe at the top of this article.

This article may not be copied or reproduced in any form without the express written consent of the author, Jaelyn Jamik, or Clarity Digital Media. Any excerpt reproduced must not exceed 75 words and must provide a link back to the original article and Examiner.com.