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Keeping your heart strong and healthy

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Heart Disease in America is a serious health problem. Many people suggests that cancer is killing more than heart disease, however that is not true. According to the American Heart Association, heart disease kills more women in the United States than all cancers combined. Take breast cancer as an example, one in thirty one American women die each year. Heart disease kills one in three each year.

Symptoms of a heart attack

Most people believe that a heart attack will occur with a gripping pain in your heart. This can be misleading. There are several symptoms when having a heart attack or when a heart attack may be coming, to be aware of and prepared for. Symptoms like shortness of breath, irregular pain in the lower or upper parts of your back, jaw pain, and nausea often tell a story about the health of your heart. These symptoms may come in many combinations or alone. You have been living with your body for many years and you know it better than anyone, if you feel like something is wrong, go with your gut. See your doctor or go to the emergency room. It’s better to know than to wonder if something is wrong, once you know you can take the necessary steps to prevent further problems.

Preventing a heart attack

The American Heart Association recommends 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise three to four times a week. Physical activity can help in many ways to reduce the risk of heart disease. Physical activity boosts energy levels, reduces stress, helps to manage or get to a healthy weight. It can also help get a more productive sleep and it improves blood circulation. If you smoke quit smoking. A combination of birth control pills and smoking is linked to an increased chance of heart disease by 20 percent. Make healthy nutritional choices. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables, avoid red meats and processed, sugary foods. Also avoid foods high in sodium.

It is important to also understand cholesterol and how to determine which cholesterol is good and which is bad. Understanding how to control your cholesterol will help reduce your risk of heart disease. Check out this PDF for more information. It is ecommended to start having your cholesterol checked at age 20 or earlier if there is a history of heart disease in the family. Some professionals also recommend those with high blood pressure or the risk of high blood pressure to follow the DASH (Dietary Approaches to stop Hypertension) diet.

Making changes today can help you and your family live a stronger, healthier life. Heart disease is often a lifestyle disease, this means that each individual is often responsible for the ramifications of the disease. Don’t be a statistic, make a change that will impact your future generations. When you live be example other members of your family will follow.

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