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Keep kitty inside

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Outdoors can be a dangerous place for a kitty to be. If they live in the country, in the city, or in the suburbs, outdoor cats face a huge number of risks. They are exposed to infectious diseases, most of which are fatal. Traffic takes an enormous toll on free-roaming cats, and though many folks believe their pets are street-smart, no cat looks both ways before crossing when being pursued by another animal. Additional dangers include pet-theft, poisons, leg-hold traps, cruel treatment by brutal people.

Outdoor felines cause problems, too. They dig around and defecate in neighbors' gardens, and as predators, they harm and kill a noteworthy number of wild animals. Cats cannot be trained to disregard their natural hunting instincts. The lone definite way to protect wildlife is to keep cats inside.

You may think you are robbing your cat of a real catly-life, but what do they lose besides getting struck by a car, feline leukemia, assaults by dogs, poisoned foodstuff, pesticides, fertilizers, anti-freeze, cat fights, worms, ticks, fleas, getting lost, abscesses, getting stolen, evil steel-jaw traps, unbelievable human cruelty, gunshot wounds, paint ball shots, puncture wounds, wild animal attacks, cold, rainy or snowy weather?

The average life span of an outdoor cat is only two to three years, while an indoor-only cat can live 15 to 20 years and more. Indoor cats are generally healthier, too, which saves greatly on veterinary bills for treatment of transmittable diseases, parasites, and abscesses from battles with other animals. Granted, cats enjoy fresh air, sunshine, and exercise, but they do not need to go outside to be contented. A little creative planning on the part of you can help indoor cats live fully.

Clearly, it is best to keep a cat in from the onset, particularly if you are starting with a kitten or adolescent. Most cats who grow up inside show no penchant to leave the safety of home; other cats who are used to going out can make life wretched for the complete household by clawing at windows, squalling and trying to flee through open doors. Despite the fact that the changeover may take some time and staying power, even the most established outdoor cat can ultimately be persuaded to appreciate the indoor comforts.

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