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Justina Pelletier and Social Justice

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Social Justice is an increasingly popular and vague term used by politicians, judges, social workers and educators. A perfect storm of bureaucratic control.

Fifteen-year-old Justina Pelletier had been treated at Tufts Medical Center for Mitochondrial Disease. When Justina developed flu-like symptoms, the Tufts doctors referred her to a doctor at Boston Children’s Hospital who specialized in gastrointestinal disorders.

However, once at Boston Children’s, Justina was not allowed to see that doctor. Instead, a Belgian neurologist and Romanian psychologist unfamiliar with her case determined she had Somatoform Disorder. The doctors instructed Justina’s parents to agree to, and sign off on, a new medical plan. This Boston Children’s plan included the stipulation Justina would cease all her medications and would not be allowed to see or speak with any other doctors.

Justina’s parents refused and became upset. The Massachusetts Department of Child and Family Services (MDCFS) was called in. Justina became a ward of the state. As such, Justina was eligible to be used for Somatoform research. After 14 months as a ward of the state, barred from necessary medical care and used for research, Justina’s physical condition continues to deteriorate and she is now partially paralyzed. If that can happen to Justina, it could happen to anyone… and likely has.

MDCFS has never done an investigation: made a home visit, spoken to neighbors, teachers or family members about Justina’s care at home. 134 children in MDCFS custody are missing.

From the National Association of Social Workers website, “Often, social workers bring social justice concepts into the wider social and political arena.” As in: A call “for examination of underlying causes” of terrorism. “…terrorism may be fueled in part by global practices that led to poverty and rage…” Another way of saying, spin it. When convenient, align it with your personal agenda. It sticks and it pays.

Social justice educators are taught to have low expectations for poor and minority students based on a plethora of difficulties, real or imagined, experienced by many of that community. The National Assessment of Educational Progress 2013 Nebraska confirms that approach: just 16% of Black 4th graders scored at or above proficient in reading, 12% in math. The poor scored just 23% and 27%, respectively. Reasons given for the poor outcomes include lack of parental involvement, marital status of parents, bank account of parents, habits of parents, etc.

I recommend Frederick Douglass’ autobiography to anyone who maintains the underlying causes of learning failure are poverty, melanin and family (social justice).

Non-union charter school educators achieve different outcomes for those same demographics. “Fifth-graders at Harlem Central Middle School, which Mr. (Mayor) deBlasio sought to close, have the highest pass rate of 2,254 schools in New York on state math exams.” (Wall Street Journal 4/3/14)

Local courts have ruled in favor of Lincoln Public Schools when a kindergartner was sexually assaulted in the bathroom during the school day (successfully appealed) and again when parents requested curricula and instructional changes recommended by their child’s therapist. Underlying causes of the children’s difficulties in both cases was deemed outside the school’s responsibility (social justice).

Over decades, we have watched our schools perpetuate learning failure, students subjected to limitless research and held under truancy laws.

A brave man was arrested at a school board meeting for questioning Common Core. Whatever your views, it is time to stand up, speak up and take action on behalf of our children’s health, education and liberty in America.

Medical care and education should be determined by parents in counsel with providers. It is contrary to our freedom to be held hostage by health or education providers. ...... Liberty and Justice for All

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