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Justice for Bullet: What will happen since evidence was cleaned up by police?

Justice for Bullet
Justice for Bullet
Facebook: Justice for Bullet

This is an update on Bullet, the dog shot in his own home by police while his owner was at work. The original Examiner article should be read before continuing.

Bullet lost his life May 30, when Round Rock police entered his home while answering a burglar alarm call at the residence. Now the police have ensured any evidence of what really happened is gone.

It's alleged police cleaned up the scene after Bullet was shot dead, hit by five out of seven bullets. The two rounds that didn't hit him were buried in the wall.

Police also took Bullet's body with them when they left. This is called destroying evidence. Round Rock police got rid of anything that could later have been used in a civil case against those responsible for his murder.

Russell Lane, Bullet's owner, didn't know to have a necropsy done on his companion. He's most likely still in shock that police could come into his home and murder his dog.

I've covered close to 100 of these cases over the past two years. When Candy Middleton was shot by a Ralls County officer a few months back, I had to do something I'd never done in the past. I contacted Candy's owner to dig up his dog and have a necropsy performed.

This resulted in criminal charges being brought against the officer who had lied about what happened. Candy was shot in the back of the head as she was retreating.

Was Bullet shot in the same manner-retreating from police? We'll never know, because police took his body, and didn't treat the scene as a crime scene. Would this situation have been looked at differently if Russell had seen all of the bullets entered Bullet from behind?

This is wrong, because if an investigation is conducted anytime an officer discharges his weapon, shouldn't the locale of the discharge be treated with the respect of the crime it is?

A supervisor revisited the scene, but only after Russell had a little talk with him down at the station. Due to police cleaning up, no one will ever really know how things looked shortly after Bullet was shot to death.

This is an advantage to the officers involved. It will be their word against Russell's as to what really took place. Russell found dog hair and bullet holes.

Police say Bullet attacked. Why weren't police intelligent enough to read the "beware of dog" sign Russell displayed. Shouldn't it be considered negligence for police not to heed the warning the sign gave?

Russell now has a Facebook page set up here. He isn't alone in his fight. The dog community is ready to rally around this man, with the hope that one day police will stop shooting family dogs.

Dogs being shot by police is a hot topic for me. Not only because of the act of cowardice displayed by those hired to 'protect and serve,' but because I'm led to believe few people read my articles.

I've written on several topics, from warning dog owners police are shooting family pets, to the dangers of having a home alarm system. Some days I feel like pulling my hair out, because if the owner of a murdered dog had read my article, tragedy could have been prevented.

I'll continue writing, with the hope someone will pass along my articles and perhaps save another dog from being killed. I did get a response from one of my readers, saying when police came to her door, she was able to put her dog in a small bathroom before answering.

To those out there who have lost a family dog to police, there are a number of articles you really need to check out ono the Facebook: Dogs Shot by Police page. There are people out there willing to fight for justice. It's just a shame most don't realize this is happening until it happens to their dog.

The articles under suggested by the author cover topics of interest that dog owners need to read. Remember that police have killed dogs in their own home, in fenced in yards, tethered, retreating and with the dog wagging its tail. Police kill not only because they feel they have to, but because they can.

Never forget that. Despite a dog being killed by police approximately ever 98 minutes, police are more than likely to get away with murder. Because to admit guilt opens the officer, his department and his community up to a lawsuit.

Please share this article, with the hope it will save a dog. Possibly even your dog.