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Jenny McCarthy's autistic son bullied at summer camp: 'They laugh at him'

Jenny McCarthy's son is being bullied: Evan has autism
Photo by Cindy Ord

Jenny McCarthy said her 12-year-old son, Evan, is being bullied at summer camp but doesn't realize it. Evan has autism, and doesn't pick up on social cues, explained a heartbroken McCarthy.

"They're laughing at him but he laughs too," Jenny said on "The View." "I said, 'You have to find the kids that like you and are nice to you."

McCarthy also said Evan usually sits by himself during lunch because no one wants to sit with him. "[I asked] Who do you sit next to in the cafeteria?' And he said, 'No one. I ask, and they say no,' " said McCarthy.

Jenny learned Evan was being bullied after a camp counselor had emailed her. McCarthy, who's living every mother's nightmare, said she's glad Evan is not aware that he's being teased behind his back.

"It's so wonderful that he's not aware that kids are making fun of him," she said. "But at what point do I need to teach him that? Evan told me, 'They ask me to put bugs down my pants and I do it and they laugh. He thinks it's funny. Do I just let him be? At what point does it stop?"

Jenny said the situation has made her concerned the bullying could escalate into something more dangerous down the line. When McCarthy asked co-host Whoopi Goldberg for advice, Whoopi (who has one daughter, three grandchildren, and one great-grandchild), suggested meeting with the parents of the kids Evan hangs out with at camp.

McCarthy Slammed For Anti-Vaccine Views

McCarthy, who will leave "The View" at the end of this season, has been a vocal autism advocate since her son was diagnosed with the developmental disability in 2005.

Over the years, Jenny has courted controversy after claiming Evan's autism was caused by the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine he received as a baby. McCarthy was heavily criticized after launching an anti-vaccine movement in 2007.

Autism is a developmental disability characterized by difficulty with communication and social interaction. There is no known cause or cure. Autism now affects one in 68 children, mostly boys.

In April 2014, McCarthy made headlines after writing an editorial in the Chicago Sun-Times insisting she is not anti-vaccine.

"I am not 'anti-vaccine,'" she wrote. "For years, I have repeatedly stated that I am, in fact, 'pro-vaccine' and for years I have been wrongly branded as 'anti-vaccine.'"

Jenny said she is merely opposed to the blanket vaccination protocol requiring multiple vaccinations for all children. "My beautiful son, Evan, inspired this mother to question the 'one-size-fits-all' philosophy of the recommended vaccine schedule," she wrote. "For my child, I asked for a schedule that would allow one shot per visit instead of the multiple shots they were and still are giving infants."