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Jenny McCarthy criticized on Twitter over vaccination beliefs

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On March 17 Fox News reports that "The View" co-host Jenny McCarthy posted an innocent question on her Twitter account asking what is the most important personality trait in your mate and was inundated with criticism on her vaccination beliefs.

Some claimed that the most important trait was someone that didn't spread lies about vaccination "toxins" and promote e-cigarettes. While others were barbed and funny like the one that claimed;

“Someone who think vaccines are safe, Botox is poisonous and who doesn't pick their nose and eat it on MTV."

Jenny McCarthy has long been a believer that her son's autism was caused from vaccines. He was diagnosed in 2005 as being on the autism spectrum, however, his grandmother, in an interview that was printed in January, claims that she saw signs ever since Evan was little, far before he was diagnosed.

In January, old reports started to circulate claiming that Evan didn't have autism and that Jenny was a liar. She received a lot of backlash and criticism from it. She shot back claiming that the reports were blatantly inaccurate and completely ridiculous.

Jenny is not the only celebrity that believes that vaccines can case autism. Recently, Kristin Cavallari also went on the record saying that her and her husband Jay Cutler, didn't vaccinate their 18-month old son Camden because she has read too many books and is concerned with her children (she's currently pregnant with her second child) becoming autistic.

To date, there is no scientific proof that can back up that vaccines are the cause of autism, or can even be attributed to it. Correlation does not mean causation, and at this point, it is purely coincidental that signs of autism begin to appear around the time that children start receiving childhood vaccines.

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