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Issues with dating a single parent

I have children, you still interested?
I have children, you still interested?
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You’ve just came across the most amazing person you have ever met. It was instant attraction; possibly love at first sight. The two of you exchange numbers and set up your first date; you’re so excited with this rare feeling. The date is in motion, amazing conversation; they shine like you’ve never seen in anyone else. You’re drawn in by the connection. The end of the dinner or whatnot you ask the question. “How do you feel about children?” The person’s response is great I am a single parent of 1, 2, 3 children. All of sudden there is complete silence in the atmosphere. You quickly become nervous and begin to not like what you’re feeling. You go home and begin to wonder if this is something you think you want to be involved in. The chemistry between the two of you is so intense that you’re positive there is something. So you ask yourself can you /are you willing to date a single parent?

This is the scenario that many single men and women go through when dating. It is unfortunate that single parents who date (when they’re ready) have to labeled as such but it is the truth; they’re parents before anything.

So let’s lay out the rules for dating a single parent. It’s this simple when you’re in a relationship with a single parent you’re also in a relationship with the kid/s. Not every single parent wants to introduce numerous people to their kid/s. If they’re lucky enough to find true love/someone very special they must make the choice for all parties involved; respect that.

There are no statistics that show that single fathers have it harder than single mothers. Dating/Relationship issues with single parents will never have any difference in genders; the fact of being a single parent remains. The issues that can and will evolve when in a relationship with a single parent will always be the same. The "He's not my father he can't tell me what to do" or the "your boyfriend tried to hit (or worse) me."

If the other biological parent is present in the children/s life take into consideration this can be an issue for some. Be prepared. Do yourselves favors and never argue in front of them, even when you “think” they’re too young to understand; they really do and can possibly hate the parent or you for breaking their bond. The kid/s will immediately show the emotions to the parent they’re not interested in the “substitute” when they’re young, it can be difficult. If they’re teenagers it will be rebellious. Do not force a child/teenager to like your “boy/girlfriend” this can possibly happen in time.

When you’re in a relationship with a single parent don’t lose patience it can work out for some but accepting to yourself that you want to be in “their life is a choice you have to make from the beginning. DO NOT enter into this kind of relationship and then months later you decide you couldn’t handle it and dump her/him. Remember not only did you hurt the single parent but you just may have broken the little one’s heart also. Be cautious. This action may also infuriate the macho (absent) biological father or the crazy (absent) biological mother.

Being in a relationship with someone who has a child or children can be great or go badly. In either scenario keep in mind to be respectful enough to know that it’s not just one person. Be fair to all parties involved. Be kind and gentle and do not leave a child or children to believe that you will be in their life "forever" unless you really will be.

So, before you pursue that person you so quickly fell for, be certain that you can date a single parent with issues and all..