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Is your cat in pain

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Cats have an uncanny way of masking their pain when they are injured or ill; often with purring.. There is also a limited amount of medical options accessible for feline pain relief. Many of the medications used to treat pain in dogs are not safe for cats.

At one time many people genuinely believed cats didn’t feel pain; but they indeed do. If something hurts you or even causes you discomfort, it’s safe to assume the same is true for a feline.

Pain is serious in cats too and one should never ignore it or wait it out. For one thing, pain can delay or prevent proper healing from injury or surgery. It can be the foundation loss of appetite, which in cats can quickly become a life and death situation.

Continual pain can cause immobility and loss of the by and large quality of life for your cat. It can also menace the bond you share with your kitty to maladaptive pain. Maladaptive pain often lasts much longer than normal pain and is significantly more challenging to treat

Masking or hiding pain is an inborn response for felines in the wild. A cat in pain is seen as weak and defenseless by other cats and predators.

Since your pampered indoor house cat isn’t all that far removed from her wild counterparts, he/she responds to pain the same way they do—not showing it.
Luckily, a tuned-in pet parent who knows what to look for can make a fairly accurate deduction when a cat is hurting.

Signs can include: acting curiously quiet or withdrawn, sitting hunched up, hiding more than usual; Aggressive behavior irritation or anxiety; refusing to lie down or sleep, loss of appetite, panting or rapid breathing, biting, hissing or running away when certain parts of the body are touched, and an altered gait.

The vast majority felines in pain do not vocalize, nonetheless, if your cat rarely yowls or cries but abruptly starts, it could be an indication there's something painful going on and a veterinarian visit is in order.

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