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Is sugar killing you?

The respected Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) finalized a study just last month which links increased sugar intake with heart disease. The study found that "most US adults consume more added sugar than is recommended for a healthy diet. [They] observed a significant relationship between added sugar consumption and increased risk for CVD mortality." This was "largely consistent across age group, sex, race/ethnicity (except among non-Hispanic blacks), educational attainment, physical activity, health eating index, and body mass index."

Added sugar: FDA proposes change to food label for first time in 20 years.
Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Furthermore, the CDC reports that "heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. More than half of the deaths due to heart disease in 2009 were in men."

The FDA is responding, and fast. Their food labels, which haven't seen a change in two decades, are set to include a special line item which allows consumers to see plainly the added sugars in the food they are buying. Says the FDA, "The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans states that intake of added sugar is too high in the U.S. population and should be reduced. The FDA proposes to include 'added sugars' on the label to help consumers know how much sugar has been added to the product."

With all of this information finally coming to light, many Americans are reacting by attempting to eliminate this toxic, addictive ingredient from their diets altogether. The Paleo Diet, Whole30 Challenge and 21 Day Sugar Detox are just a few of the diets taking a firm hold of the population. Each one has a nutrition plan in place, but their unifying factor is the complete elimination of all added sugars.

The conclusion is simple here: Heart disease is the single-most deadly condition facing Americans today. Sugar is now proven to increase risk of heart disease. Continue eating it at your own risk.

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