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Is Common Core Testing an Invasion of Your Child's Privacy?

The last article finished a brief discussion of a four part, true or false question asked of respondents who identified themselves as knowledgeable about Common Core. The fourth question was particularly troubling. This question basically asked the respondents whether they believed it was true that the federal government will receive detailed data on each individual student’s test performance. Sixty-nine percent said they thought that was true. The writer wonders if they realized how troubling a thought this can be for parents.

For example, very recently, a Westchester parent gave form to her concerns in the form of a letter. Her concerns were published in the Community Views section of the local paper. She was articulate in expressing her outrage about the negative direction Education is taking with the implementation of the Common Core and the diminishing right of parents to be able to protect their children from the ever growing intrusion into personal information wrote…

Now throw in standardized testing that is developmentally inappropriate, contains unnecessary branding and ambiguous test questions just to name a few, lingering data privacy issues, and parental rights being diminished by Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) amendments. You bet parents are worried and concerned...

http://www.thomasmore.org/, a not for profit public interest law center located in Ann Arbor, Michigan made the following statement about the activation of databases…

The last article finished a brief discussion of a four part, true or false question asked of respondents who identified themselves as knowledgeable about Common Core. The fourth question was particularly troubling. This question basically asked the respondents whether they believed it was true that the federal government will receive detailed data on each individual student’s test performance. Sixty-nine percent said they thought that was true. The writer wonders if they realized how troubling a thought this can be for parents.

For example, very recently, a Westchester parent gave form to her concerns in the form of a letter. Her concerns were published in the Community Views section of the local paper. She was articulate in expressing her outrage about the negative direction Education is taking with the implementation of the Common Core and the diminishing right of parents to be able to protect their children from the ever growing intrusion into personal information wrote…

Now throw in standardized testing that is developmentally inappropriate, contains unnecessary branding and ambiguous test questions just to name a few, lingering data privacy issues, and parental rights being diminished by Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) amendments. You bet parents are worried and concerned...

http://www.thomasmore.org/, a not for profit public interest law center located in Ann Arbor, Michigan made the following statement about the activation of databases…

"These state databases, often referred to as P-20 systems, like Common Core are tied to federal funding, through No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top waivers, and in some instances can contain over 400 individual data points per student including health-care histories, income information, religious affiliations, voting status, blood types, likes and dislikes and homework completion. The data is then available to numerous public agencies. Despite federal student privacy protections guaranteed by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, (FERPA) the administration is paving the way for private entities to buy the data while the U.S. Department of Education is encouraging the shift from aggregate data collection to individual student data collection."

Is the overemphasis on testing an excuse for a broader range of data collecting on the federal level? As a parent are you comfortable with the government collecting data on your child? What do you think about the possible circumvention of parental permission in accumulating data? Please read, respond and subscribe.

Is the overemphasis on testing an excuse for a broader range of data collecting on the federal level? As a parent are you comfortable with the government collecting data on your child? What do you think about the possible circumvention of parental permission in accumulating data? Please read, respond and subscribe.