Skip to main content
  1. News
  2. Politics
  3. Republican

Is California's Minors' “Erase Law” Needed To delete Bad Social Media Posts?

See also

Social media and minors can be a disaster in the making when they post embarrassing ‘selfies’, or mean tweets that come back to haunt them in school or in jobs. Now, according to Fox News the new California “Erase Law” which was signed into law this week, gives these often regrettable posts a do-over as if they never existed. For minors and their often outraged and embarrassed parents self-respect can possibly be restored.

But is this the answer for wayward acting minors who with a keystroke can betray confidences, destroy friendships and even engage in “Mean Girl” type posts and then escape responsibility with a simple keystroke? What is the law’s passage truly protecting?

For some parents and perhaps lots and lots of kids or teens, the control of their accidental or sometimes intentional posts will be in their control. So in effect it works as an “oops button”, when sexting Facebook or Twitter posts make the rounds around school like wildfire.

James Steyer, who is the founder and chief executive of Common Sense Media feels that control should be in the hands of parents and minors and not a tech company, reported Fox News.

Will the law actually insure that minors are going to behave more responsibly while internet surfing or posting on Facebook or Twitter? Of course the school is still out on that one, but many of the backers of the California legislation are hoping that congress passes a federal law that will replicate California’s new law.

As for the parents of the kids and teens that will now be able to use the do over “Erase Law” perhaps a little more monitoring and a lot more teaching responsibility will insure that those type of erasure do over deletions are going to be less and less necessary.

__________________________________
Copyright © 2014 Kevin Fobbs. If you like this article you can subscribe above to receive email updates whenever Kevin Fobbs publishes on Examiner.com.

Advertisement