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Interview with picture book author Deb Lund

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Deb Lund is the author of Harcourt’s best-selling picture dinobooks and Monsters on Machines. She’s a writing teacher, creativity coach, and creator of FICTION MAGIC: Card Tricks & Tips for Writers, now on Kickstarter.

For what age audience do you write?

My published books are all picture books, and I’ve just completed an upper middle-grade historical fantasy that takes place in Portugal in 1762. I’m also working on a YA series and an adult novel.

Henry: Wow, you are working across a wide spectrum of audiences.

Tell us about your latest book.

DINOSOARING joined DINOSAILORS and ALL ABOARD THE DINOTRAIN. This has been a popular series about gargantuan dino goofballs who take off on adventures. So far they’ve traveled by boat, train, and airplane.

Henry: Well, after getting seasick in DINOSAILORS, I can see why they’d explore alternative means of transportation.

What do you hope readers will get from reading that book?

Besides enjoying the rollicking rhythms and rhymes, I hope it helps them find their own sense of adventure. A public librarian once told me that my books were never the “behind the couch” books at her house. When I asked what that meant, she said they never minded reading my books over and over. When they got bored with a book, they would stretch their arm over the back of the couch and drop the book behind it. It would take weeks to figure out what happened to it.

Henry: Ah, I used a similar technique as a child, hiding unwanted parts of my dinner under the plate or napkin.

What aspect of writing do you find most challenging?

For me, the most challenging aspect of being a writer is carving out time. While I’ve learned to create fairly well in the middle of chaos, I need to deal better with distractions. I love new thoughts and ideas, and I enjoy revision, but my mind is always whirring away and picking up cues from this and that. It’s amazing how much I get done at times with all the competition going on in my brain!

Henry: Yes, operating from within the eye of a swirling vortex of kid chaos – the bane of all work-from-home parents.

What is a powerful lesson you've learned from being a writer?

Just one? How about a few? Hard work pays off. Being stubborn is an asset. I am not alone. Anxiety and blocks are part of the creative process. I have gifts to share with others.

Henry: Thank you for sharing them!

What has been a memorable experience that you never would have had if you had not been a writer?

Seeing that first giant-sized hardcover book arrive with a big dinosaur face on the front, and under that face, a name exactly like mine.

Henry: Yes, that thrill of seeing your name up in lights like a movie star!

Read the rest of this interview at Henry's blog on KidLit, Fantasy & Science Fiction.

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