Skip to main content

See also:

International Opinion Review, Friday Sept 7, 2012: Conventions, Romney, Obama

Sept 7, 2012

Canada: Macleans

Luiza Savage

The President is now the common man. It’s the new political message from Team Obama, and it just may be working. Macleans

Luiza Savage

Why gaffe-prone, wooden Romney could—with the help of some big backers and a sputtering economy—still unseat Obama. Macleans

New Zealand: The Herald

Philip Duncan

One Republican, interviewed on MSNBC, expressed his unhappiness about the Convention sharing space with Isaac: "Reporters are very quick to wanna do a double box with what's happening in New Orleans," he said, looking at the monitor, where a small satellite image showed Isaac about to hit New Orleans. He sighed. The Herald

France: Le Figaro

Translated By Google Translation and IOR

Wall Street welcomed the arrival of Paul Ryan on the Republican ticket. A VP who is pro-business and fiscally (not limited to tax) conservative. He likes the Stock Exchange. The Representative of Wisconsin holds shares of Apple, Exxon Mobil, GE, Procter & Gamble, IBM, Google, McDonald’s, Berkshire Hathaway–the fund of the Oracle of Omaha, Warren Buffett. Nothing but Blue Chip. Among the most important contributors to his campaign: UBS, Bank of American, Wells Fargo and Goldman Sachs. However, Wall Street may have a few surprises in the coming weeks, as journalists will be interested in his votes and positions in the House of Representatives. Wall Street be may in for difficult time. Le Figaro

Poland: Tok FM

Zbigniew Lewicki

America is certainly a country that operates on the basis of religion. This is due to historical reasons – when the country was founded and how. It is a country that has never fought against religion; there has never been movement in this direction–and it is also extremely tolerant country when it comes to what religion one professes. Tok

Japan: Nikkei:

The U.S. presidential election campaign is nearing its end. The course now taken by the U.S. regarding its economy and national security will have a significant impact on Japan as well. The current election campaign is mostly centered around domestic policies, such as health insurance reform. There is hope, however, for a debate that extends beyond internal issues. Nikkei

For more International Opinion Review see: IOR Examiner

The International Opinion Review is updated every Monday and Friday. The views expressed in the commentaries are those solely of the commentators who may represent any political point of view. The commentaries are not endorsed by the Examiner or Examiner.com who are acting solely as a commentary aggregator for the public interest.

Comments