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India tiger virus killing off species: Experts say it may be too late to contain

An India tiger virus has spread across areas of India with some experts saying it may be too late to contain this virus, which is usually found in dogs. The spokesperson for the National Tiger Conservation Authority, Rajesh Gobel confirmed that in the last 12 months at least four tigers died from the canine distemper virus, according to The Inquisitr on Jan. 14.

India tiger virus could render the species extinct.
Photo by Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

While India officials are testing every tiger carcass that they find in hopes of getting a handle on how widespread this virus has become, they’ve also embarked on another feat of grand proportions. Their plan is to vaccinate the more than one million dogs roaming India.

While this goal is almost impossible admits Gopel, the hopes of getting at least 50 percent of the dogs vaccinated around the zones that house sanctuaries he considers a possible goal. Scientists are saying that it is already too late to contain this virus.

Some experts have even vocalized their thoughts that trying to contain this virus is a waste of time. Ullas Karanth, the director of the Wildlife Conservation Society said:

“Thinking we can control this is totally unrealistic. We have to live with it now, and assess whether it’s really serious yet. What South Africa has done, quarantining huge areas and creating disease-free spaces in the wild, is not feasible here.”

The officials in India are trying to get a better idea of just how wide-spread this virus is today. These tigers are already on the endangered species list, so will this be an end to this species in India?