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Inaccurate EPA MPG Estimates

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Whenever you decide to buy, lease or simply research a vehicle you can find all sorts of great information online or at the dealership.

This holds true for almost everything from learning about the features, selecting the right trim options and vehicle that suits your every day needs.

For most of your more technical questions one can buy the repair manual specific to that vehicle or visit one's trusted mechanic. Having said that whenever you ask someone to give you an accurate estimate of how far a certain vehicle will go on a gallon of gas, they will either reply, (It depends) or throw a bunch of EPA estimates at you.

The problem with EPA MPG estimates is that they don't take your personal needs into consideration. They are based on standards that are far over inflated and that appeal to consumers. These estimates always turn out to be imprecise because they rely on perfect set conditions that really don't apply to real everyday driving.

If you live in the countryside and have to drive up and down hills your MPG will be very different to someone who drives their vehicle on regular city streets. The same can be said for a single male commuter as oppose to a family man who will be lugging around 2 or more passengers, including stroller car seat and other required luggage.

There are so many variables that can impact your MPG performance so bashing the EPA estimations isn't really fair. Anything from a bump on the exterior of your vehicle, the wrong tire pressure, rough roads, dirty filters, overloading with cargo, poorly timed traffic lights and exhausting traffic conditions all do their part in reducing your driving distance capabilities.

One thing holds true about all EPA MPG estimates is that you should expect your vehicle to travel well below what is predicted, especially if you are not making use of your econ button and drive mostly on city streets during poor whether conditions.

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